Prince Harry gets honest about quarantine with 11-month-old baby Archie

The Duke of Sussex spoke about being able to spend more time with his son during the coronavirus quarantine, while also praising other parents.

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/ Source: TODAY
By Scott Stump

Prince Harry has tried to savor the extra time he has at home with his 11-month-old son, Archie, while in coronavirus quarantine with Meghan, Duchess of Sussex, at their new home in Los Angeles.

Harry shared his appreciation for being able to have fun with Archie during a 30-minute video call on Easter with a nurse, two British parents of children with serious illnesses, and the CEO of the British charity WellChild.

"There’s a hell of a lot of positives that are happening at the same time and being able to have family time — so much family time — that you almost think, ‘Do I feel guilty for having so much family time?'" Harry said. "You’ve got to celebrate those moments where you are just on the floor rolling around in hysterics.

"Inevitably, half an hour later, maybe a day later, there’s going to be something that you have to deal with, and there’s no way you can run away from it."

The former royal couple and their son have been living in California after officially stepping back from their roles as senior members of the British royal family on March 31.

Harry has been a patron of WellChild for more than 10 years, helping to spotlight a charity that provides assistance to families of children with severe illnesses. During the call, he praised parents Craig Hatch and Leanne Cooper, whose respective children both have cerebral palsy and multiple other serious illnesses.

"The resilience and the strength that you guys have is absolutely incredible," he said. "You must never, ever, ever, ever forget that. Of course, there are going to be hard days — I can’t even begin to imagine how hard it is for you guys.

"Having one kid at 11 months old is enough!” he said.

Cooper, whose 13-year-old daughter has cerebral palsy, dystonia and scoliosis, spoke about the frightening situation that parents of children with severe illnesses have found themselves in due to the coronavirus.

"There is a lot of information out there, but not a lot for vulnerable families and certainly not for children with complex medical needs,'' she said. "If we’re in a position where carers can’t come to work because they might be symptomatic, there is no way we would survive when Sophie needs care seven nights a week, seven days a week, 24 hours a day. It is terrifying."

"This is hard on everyone, but it is especially hard on you,'' Harry said. "I know that WellChild are doing everything they can to support you. Hopefully through this video, we can make it more clear and obvious to government and everybody else that you are in the ‘vulnerable’ bracket and WellChild needs more help."

Harry was also asked on the call how he and his family are holding up during the pandemic.

"Not too bad,'' he said. "I think it’s certainly strange times — everyone is experiencing the same thing in a very unique way. But the longer this goes on for, I imagine the harder it is for each and every one of you.

"It’s all about morale. If morale is up, if you wake up in the morning and go, ‘Right, new day, got my whole family here, what are we going to do?’ Of course, there’s that fear of what might happen, but there’s so much that’s out of our control, and all of the sudden we’ve realized how small we are in the grand scheme of things."

Harry and Meghan have also announced that they have arranged for $112,000 in profits from the BBC broadcast of their May 2018 wedding to be donated to Feeding Britain, an organization that works to eliminate hunger in the U.K.

The donation came less than two weeks after they unveiled their plans to launch a new nonprofit endeavor called Archewell. They also have been sending out messages of hope during a difficult time across the world with the spread of the coronavirus.

Harry kept up that theme by ending the recent call with a note of positivity.

"It is really nice to see you all smiling and happy,'' he said. "Keep going, keep the morale up, keep busy, keep being creative, dare yourself to try new hobbies, and I hope to see you all again very, very soon!"