Style

First beauty trend of 2017? We can't take our eyes off these glowing designs

Maybe you've seen henna designs before, but probably not like this.

And to be clear, these glow-in-the-dark designs aren't truly henna — that implies they're made with the same dye from plants that traditional henna artists use. But, alas, search #UVHenna on Instagram and you're bound to see dozens of neon-colored, detailed designs similar to the ones also done with henna.

Asma Ali Hassan
While this wearable art isn't truly made from henna, they follow a similar design.

"It's really just body paint you use on the skin, except with this, it's done the same way you would henna," Asma Hassan, a henna artist in London, told TODAY Style. "So (it's) coned and then piped out, like icing a cake. You pipe it through the cone and it's an easy way to make intricate designs on the body."

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The UV henna art glows under a UV light and has become increasingly popular for parties and music festivals, she said, along with white henna.

Asma Ali Hassan
The designs glow under a UV light.

"White henna is probably the most popular thing I've been doing in the past year, and I think the UV is an extension of that," Hassan said. "Bloggers in the Middle East started wearing the white and it's caught the attention of a lot of British artists here — it's very pretty."

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"I think you'll start seeing it more in magazines and music videos," she continued. "I think it's going to be huge for festivals."

Asma Ali Hassan
White henna lasts a few days, and UV body paint washes right off.

Unlike traditional henna, which is reddish-brown and can last between one and three weeks, white henna lasts a few days, and UV body paint washes right off.

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"It's way more accessible," Hassan said. "For people who think henna is exclusively for a particular culture, we're saying anyone who likes body art can experiment and go for it."

Not everyone is convinced the trend will take off. One New York City artist told TODAY Style she hadn't heard of UV henna artwork or gotten any requests for it yet, and reminded us that people should know these glowing designs aren't truly henna.

But hey, if it happened for temporary tattoos, why not UV body paint? Perhaps these UV henna tattoos will even replace flower crowns at your next music festival.

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