Make Ina Garten's foolproof Hanukkah feast: Brisket, latkes and honey cake

Cookbook author and TV show host Ina Garten is joining TODAY Food to share a few of her favorite festive recipes for Hanukkah from her books "Cooking for Jeffrey: A Barefoot Contessa Cookbook" and "Barefoot Contessa Parties!: Ideas and Recipes for Easy Parties That Are Really Fun." She shows us how to make tender brisket with vegetables, crispy potato pancakes and a spiced honey cake with bourbon and almonds.

Ina Garten shows you how to cook her special holiday brisket

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    Nathan Congleton / TODAY

    Servings: 10-12

    Brisket is a great one-pot meal; the meat and vegetables are roasted together for hours. I make the meat ahead of time, slice it when it's cooled a bit, then reheat it with the vegetables in a pretty ovenproof serving dish. This recipe will definitely make enough to have leftovers.

    Technique tip: Don't confuse corned beef brisket with plain brisket. Corned beef is the same cut, but it has been processed with salt and spices.

    Ingredients

      • 6 to 7 pounds beef brisket
      • 2 tablespoons kosher salt
      • 2 teaspoons freshly ground black pepper
      • 1 tablespoon minced garlic (about 4 cloves)
      • 2 teaspoons dried oregano leaves
      • 1 pound carrots, peeled and cut into 2-inch chunks
      • 8 stalks celery, cut into 2-inch chunks
      • 6 yellow onions, peeled and sliced
      • 6 fresh or dried bay leaves
      • Two 28-ounce cans tomato juice

    Preparation

    1. Preheat the oven to 350°F.

    2. Place the brisket in a heavy roasting pan. In a small bowl, combine the salt, pepper, garlic and oregano.

    3. Rub the mixture on the brisket. Pile the carrots, celery, onions and bay leaves on the brisket and pour in enough tomato juice to come about three quarters of the way up the meat and vegetables. Cover the stew completely with parchment paper, then with the aluminum foil (the tomato juice will react unpleasantly with the aluminum foil if they touch.)

    4. Bake for 3½ hours, or until the meat is tender. Remove the meat from the pan and keep it warm. Place the pan on 2 burners and boil the vegetables and sauce over medium heat for another 30 minutes, or until the sauce is thickened.

    5. To serve, slice the meat across the grain. Serve with the vegetables.

    Reprinted from Barefoot Contessa Parties!: Ideas and Recipes for Easy Parties That Are Really Fun. Copyright © 2001 by Ina Garten. Photographs copyright © 2001 by James Merrell. Published by Clarkson Potter/Publishers, an imprint of Penguin Random House, LLC.

    TODAY has affiliate relationships, so we may get a small share of the revenue from your purchases. Items are sold by the retailer, not by TODAY.

    Related video

    Ina Garten shows you how to cook her special holiday brisket

    Brisket is a great one-pot meal; the meat and vegetables are roasted together for hours. I make the meat ahead of time, slice it when it's cooled a bit, then reheat it with the vegetables in a pretty ovenproof serving dish. This recipe will definitely make enough to have leftovers.

    TODAY

    I have always made potato pancakes with grated potatoes for crisp pancakes, but I've also thought about making them with mashed potatoes for creamy ones. When I read that Andrew Zimmern's grandmother made potato pancakes with both of them together, I had an aha! moment. Even better! 

    Make-ahead tip: Prepare the mixture and refrigerate for several hours. Fry just before serving or up to 30 minutes ahead. Place on a sheet pan, and reheat at 400 degrees for 5 to 10 minutes.

    Ingredients

      • 1 pound Yukon Gold potatoes, unpeeled and 1-inch-diced
      • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
      • 2 pounds Idaho baking potatoes, peeled
      • 1 large yellow onion
      • 2 extra-large eggs, lightly beaten
      • 1/2 cup panko (Japanese bread flakes) or matzo meal
      • 3 tablespoons minced fresh chives, plus extra for serving
      • Unsalted butter
      • Good olive oil
      • Sour cream, for serving

    Preparation

    Place the Yukon Gold potatoes in a large pot of boiling salted water and simmer for 15 to 20 minutes, until very tender when tested with a knife. Drain and pass through a ricer or the coarsest blade of a food mill into a large bowl and set aside.

    Grate the Idaho potatoes lengthwise in long shreds, either by hand or in a food processor fitted with the coarsest grating disk. Place the potatoes on a kitchen towel, squeeze out most of the liquid, and transfer to the bowl with the cooked potatoes. (Don't worry — they'll turn pink.) Grate the onion either by hand or in the food processor and stir into the potatoes along with the eggs, panko, chives, 2 teaspoons salt, and 1 teaspoon pepper.

    Heat 2 tablespoons of butter with 1 tablespoon of olive oil in a large (12-inch) sauté pan over medium-high heat, until sizzling. Drop heaping tablespoons of the potato mixture into the skillet (you want them to be messy). Flatten the pancakes lightly with a metal spatula and cook for 2 to 3 minutes on each side, until browned. Continue adding butter and oil, as needed, to fry the remaining batter. Serve hot with sour cream and chives.

    Reprinted from Cooking for Jeffrey: A Barefoot Contessa Cookbook. Copyright © 2016 by Ina Garten. Photographs by Quentin Bacon. Published by Clarkson Potter/Publishers, an imprint of Penguin Random House, LLC.

    TODAY has affiliate relationships, so we may get a small share of the revenue from your purchases. Items are sold by the retailer, not by TODAY.

    Related video

    Make potato pancakes, fig and goat cheese bruschettas: Ina Garten shows how

    I have always made potato pancakes with grated potatoes for crisp pancakes, but I've also thought about making them with mashed potatoes for creamy ones. When I read that Andrew Zimmern's grandmother made potato pancakes with both of them together, I had an aha! moment. Even better!

    Quentin Bacon / Cooking for Jeffrey: A Barefoot Contessa Cookbook

    Servings: 12-16

    Honey cake is a classic Jewish holiday dessert; I like it moist, spicy, and topped with toasted almonds. Mine has layers and layers of subtle flavor from honey, brown sugar, orange zest, coffee, and spices like cinnamon, cloves, allspice, and ginger. How good does that sound? Oh! And one more thing: bourbon!

    Technique tip: Prepare the cake completely, wrap tightly in plastic wrap, and store at room temperature for one day, refrigerate for up to 4 days, or freeze for up to 4 months.

    Ingredients

      • 1 cup vegetable oil, plus extra for the pan
      • 3¾ cups all-purpose flour, plus extra for the pan
      • 1½ cups granulated sugar
      • 1 cup honey
      • 1/2 cup light brown sugar, lightly packed
      • 3 extra-large eggs, at room temperature
      • 2 teaspoons grated orange zest (from 2 oranges)
      • 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
      • 1 tablespoon baking powder
      • 1 teaspoon baking soda
      • 4 teaspoons ground cinnamon
      • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
      • 1/2 teaspoon ground cloves
      • 1/2 teaspoon ground allspice
      • 1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
      • 1 cup hot coffee
      • 1/2 cup freshly squeezed orange juice (from 2 oranges)
      • 1/2 cup good bourbon, such as Maker's Mark
      • 1/2 cup blanched sliced almonds

    Preparation

    1. Preheat the oven to 350°F. Brush a 9-inch angel food cake pan with a non-removable bottom with oil, line the bottom with parchment paper, then oil and flour the pan.

    2. In the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, mix the oil, granulated sugar, honey, brown sugar, eggs, orange zest, and vanilla on medium speed for one minute. In another bowl, sift together the flour, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon, salt, cloves, allspice and ginger, and blend.

    3. Combine the coffee, orange juice, and bourbon in a 2-cup glass measuring cup. With the mixer on low, alternately add the flour and liquid mixtures to the oil-sugar mixture in thirds, beginning and ending with flour, until combined. Scrape down the bowl with a rubber spatula (the batter will be very liquidy).

    4. Pour the batter into the prepared pan. Rap the pan 5 times on the counter to get rid of any bubbles in the batter. Sprinkle the top with the almonds. Bake in the center of the oven for 40 to 45 minutes, until a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean. Cool completely, then remove from the pan and place almond side up on a flat serving plate. Serve at room temperature.

    Reprinted from Cooking for Jeffrey: A Barefoot Contessa Cookbook. Copyright © 2016 by Ina Garten. Photographs by Quentin Bacon. Published by Clarkson Potter/Publishers, an imprint of Penguin Random House, LLC.

    TODAY has affiliate relationships, so we may get a small share of the revenue from your purchases. Items are sold by the retailer, not by TODAY.

    Related video

    Ina Garten shows you how to cook her special holiday brisket

    Honey cake is a classic Jewish holiday dessert; I like it moist, spicy and topped with toasted almonds. Mine has layers and layers of subtle flavor from honey, brown sugar, orange zest, coffee, and spices like cinnamon, cloves, allspice, and ginger. How good does that sound? Oh! And one more thing: bourbon!

    If you like those holiday recipes, you should also try these:

    Parsnip and Kale Hanukkah Latkes

    Get the Recipe

    Slow-Cooker Falling-Off-the-Bone Short Ribs

    Get the Recipe