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/ Source: TODAY
By Ree Hines

Queen Elizabeth II is the now monarch of social media.

The 92-year-old British royal visited London's Science Museum Thursday morning and announced an upcoming exhibit that will focus on the history of intelligence communications — from hand-written to high-tech — and she marked the occasion by embracing one of today's go-to forms of communications.

During her visit, the queen discovered a document that seemed fitting for her first-ever Instagram post — a letter from the Royal Archives that that was sent to her great-great-grandfather, Prince Albert, back in 1843.

"Charles Babbage, credited as the world’s first computer pioneer, designed the 'Difference Engine', of which Prince Albert had the opportunity to see a prototype in July 1843," she wrote alongside two photos of the document. "In the letter, Babbage told Queen Victoria and Prince Albert about his invention the 'Analytical Engine' upon which the first computer programmes were created by Ada Lovelace, a daughter of Lord Byron."

She went on to write, "Today, I had the pleasure of learning about children’s computer coding initiatives and it seems fitting to me that I publish this Instagram post, at the Science Museum which has long championed technology, innovation and inspired the next generation of inventors."

She signed her post, "Elizabeth R." — the "R" stands for "Regina," which is Latin for queen.

The exhibit the royal was there to announce, "Top Secret: From Ciphers to Cyber Security," opens to the public in July.

While this was the first time Queen Elizabeth has used The 'Gram, this wasn't her first time sharing her thoughts on social media.

That happened back in 2014, when the regent tweeted for the first time — from a familiar location.

Her equally apt purpose at the time was to open the "Information Age" exhibit at the Science Museum.

And while she hasn't exactly taken social media by storm since then, she has popped up from time to time for to tweet a note of thanks or to help out another member of the family.

That's what she did back in 2016, when she joined Prince Harry for a memorable mic-drop moment in support of the Invictus Games that he shared on Instagram.

Royal watchers will just have to wait and see if the queen ever makes it to Snapchat.