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/ Source: TODAY
By Marguerite Ward

No carbs? No carb limits? A new Harvard University study is getting closer to answering our many questions on carbohydrates. It goes without saying that it's one of the top health stories this week.

For weight management, cut down on carbs

A Harvard University study found that a low-carbohydrate diet boosted the number of calories a person burned and helped people keep their weight in check. TODAY talked with Dr. Oz about the new research, which suggests that people who follow a diet of 20 percent carbs, 60 percent fat and 20 percent protein burn more calories than those who don't. While the study isn't a complete answer to our carb questions, it has some good findings (scroll to the end to see the list): including that you should replace highly processed carbs (like white rice) with unprocessed ones (think starchy veggies).

The extra steps are worth it!

The Department of Health & Human Services is urging adults and kids to sit less and move more. Kids and teens age 6 to 17 should get 1 hour of moderate to intense activity each day. Adults should get 2 hours and 30 minutes of moderate activity each week or more. But before you get discouraged, consider all the ways you can get more active. Taking the stairs, parking farther away from the grocery store, making your dog walk a bit longer ... all of these small, extra steps add up!

FDA restricts all flavored e-cigs, moves to ban menthol

It’s no secret that e-cigarettes with flavors like fruit and mango are more appealing to teens and young adults. So to curb spiking e-cigarette rates among young people, the Food and Drug Administration is restricting sales of flavored cartridge-based e-cigs to underage smokers, both in stores and online, NBC News reports. The FDA also started the process for banning menthol in all combustible cigarettes, and to ban flavors in cigars.

What happened when 2 people tried intermittent fasting

You’ve probably heard of intermittent fasting or “IF,” the diet plan where you don't eat for periods of time. Two people IF for one month, using the 16:8 regimen: 16 hours of fasting with an 8-hour period where you can eat. A nutritionist told them how to do it best, including how you need to drink enough water and eat healthy foods. Both participants said that their clothes fit them better after the challenge! Check out their story.