Health & Wellness

Kristen Bell reveals why she opened up about her depression

With her cheerful demeanor and a self-described "bubbly" personality, it's unlikely anyone would have ever guessed that Kristen Bell struggles with depression, anxiety and co-dependency — and that's exactly why she chose to speak out about it.

During a recent with chat with TODAY's Billy Bush, the actress explained that it was an important decision.

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Kristen Bell, Ted Danson on 'The Good Place,' 'Cheers,' Bell's depression battle

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Kristen Bell, Ted Danson on 'The Good Place,' 'Cheers,' Bell's depression battle

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"I was talking with my husband, and it occurred to me that I do appear to be very bubbly and positive," she said. "I've never really shared what got me there and why I'm that way or the things that I've worked through. And I felt it was sort of a social responsibility I had — to not just appear to be so positive and optimistic."

RELATED: Kristen Bell opens up about having 'no shame' in battling anxiety, depression

So earlier this year, the star whose credits include "Veronica Mars," "House of Lies" and "Bad Moms" spoke about her mental health history with "Off Camera" — including the fact that her positive outlook is, in part, a result of the difficulties she's faced.

"I'm extremely co-dependent," she said at the time. "I shatter a little bit when I think people don't like me. That's part of why I lead with kindness and I compensate by being very bubbly all the time, because it really hurts my feelings when I know I'm not liked. And I know that's not very healthy, and I fight it all the time."

RELATED: Kristen Bell: 'There's nothing weak about struggling with mental illness'

Getting real about such personal battles can have consequences for someone who works in an industry that relies so much on the illusion of perfection. But that never factored into Bell's decision to talk about depression.

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Kristen Bell on TODAY.

"I didn't really think about it," she told Bush. "It's not a priority for me what other people think. It's a priority to reach people who might be struggling with similar issues that I've struggled with."

Bell's message to them is simple.

"I just wanted other people to know there are options out there if they feel a sense of depression or anxiety," she said.

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