Pop Culture

Find out which actress almost had Anne Hathaway's part in 'The Devil Wears Prada'

It's hard to believe it's been 10 years since "The Devil Wears Prada" first hit theaters, and it's even harder to imagine anyone other than Anne Hathaway and Meryl Streep in the much-loved fashion film's lead roles.

But as it turns out, Hathaway wasn't the first actress offered the part of Miranda Priestly's eager (and beleaguered) assistant Andy.

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Anne Hathaway; Rachel McAdams

That honor went to Rachel McAdams, who was fresh off big box office hits, including "Mean Girls" and "The Notebook," but she said no — more than once, according to Variety.

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"I didn’t have to audition,” Hathaway told the magazine of her path to the part. "I had to be patient. I wasn’t the first choice."

Knowing that, she focused on trying to prove she was the best choice. In fact, when she first met with then-Fox 2000 vice president Carla Hacken about the role, Hathaway wrote "hire me" in the sand of the executive's Zen garden — for Hacken to discover later.

While that was unlikely the deciding factor, it didn't hurt.

Barry Wetcher / Twentieth Centur
Andrea Sachs (Anne Hathaway) tries to survive her impossibly demanding, magazine-editor boss, Miranda Priestly (Meryl Streep), in "The Devil Wears Prada."

As for Streep, fans of the film aren't the only ones who can't imagine anyone else playing the part of icy magazine editor Miranda Priestly. The filmmakers never even considered anyone else.

“I don’t remember anything other than, 'Please God — let it be Meryl," Hacken told Variety.

Of course it was. And with the star came a scene that wasn't expected to ever make it into the movie — Miranda's unforgettable take down of Andy's fashion ignorance, pointing out the novice assistant's "lumpy blue sweater" wasn't just blue. Or turquoise. Or lapis.

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The scene was brilliant, pointed and all inspired by Streep.

“It didn’t serve the narrative," screenwriter Aline Brosh McKenna said of the original idea for the scene in an interview with the New York Post. “(But) Meryl is really someone who is interested in explaining, having people understand always that Miranda had a serious job that she believed in and that she had faith in and she understood and a sense of importance of fashion in the world and why she thought fashion was important. Meryl wanted to make it bigger.”

And make we all knew what "cerulean" blue really looked like.

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