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Bob Harper on his heart attack: ‘I had what they call a widow-maker’

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In an exclusive interview with TODAY’s Savannah Guthrie, celebrity fitness trainer Bob Harper talks about the shocking heart attack he suffered 50 days ago. “I was in full cardiac arrest; my heart was stopped,” Harper says. Of his road to recovery, he says “It’s been hard,” but he vows to enjoy “very single day” of his life from now on, and urges viewers to have their own hearts checked if they have a family history.