Nike will donate 30,000 special shoes to 'everyday heroes' fighting COVID-19

The Air Zoom Pulse sneakers were specifically designed for nurses, doctors and health providers.
/ Source: TODAY

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Nike announced they will donate 30,000 pairs of shoes to health care workers on the front lines of the COVID-19 crisis. But they aren't just any sneakers.

The Air Zoom Pulse was specifically designed for "everyday heroes," like doctors, nurses and other medical professionals, who are on their feet for hours at a time.

"The effort is led by messages of gratitude to healthcare professionals," the company wrote on its website. "From one athlete to another, Nike athletes recognize the physical and mental resilience of healthcare athletes."

Nike partnered with the charity Good360 to help deliver the clog-inspired footwear to hospitals in Chicago, Los Angeles, Memphis, New York City and within the Veterans Health Administration, according to a statement.

An additional 2,500 pairs are being sent to European cities, including Barcelona, Berlin, London, Milan and Paris.

The news is getting lots of traction on Twitter, with many people applauding the sneaker giant's generosity.

"Great move by @nike. My mom was a nurse and she obsessed over footwear to get thru her shifts the way a distance runner obsesses over trainers," wrote one person.

Added another, "My front line teams are working tirelessly...way to go."

Nike Air Zoom Pulse

When the design launched in December 2019, Nike described the kicks as feeling like a “soft, snug hug” and noted that they feature an easy-to-clean design. A coated toe box protects against all kinds of spills and, most importantly, they are comfortable to wear for long periods of time. Nike found that, on average, nurses walk four to five miles and sit for less than an hour during their 12-hour workday.

This story was originally published Dec. 10, 2019.