Get Stuff We Love

Subscribe to our newsletter.
SUBSCRIBE
/ Source: TODAY
By Chrissy Callahan

When Evan Rachel Wood posed topless at the age of 18, she felt pretty amazing. Sadly, that feeling was short lived.

Soon after the actress posed semi-nude for Flaunt Magazine in 2012, a journalist from Vogue Italia wrote a scathing article about her photos. Seven years later, Wood is reflecting on the experience and making peace with the writer who caused her pain all those years ago.

The 31-year-old recently came across photos from her topless photo shoot while compiling a bunch of throwback photos for Instagram. And when she saw the shots, Wood instantly remembered how awful she felt after reading Guilia Blasi's column.

"A familiar feeling washed over me. This feeling of worthlessness," the actress wrote on Twitter.

Actress Evan Rachel Wood in 2012, the year she posed topless for Flaunt Magazine.Frank Trapper / Corbis via Getty Images

In the Vogue Italia article, Blasi claimed the actress was too "flawless" and "far too young to be sophisticated." The writer then went on to compare Wood to other famous actresses like Meryl Streep and Julianne Moore, arguing that "the most memorable thespians are not always the most flawlessly beautiful."

According to Blasi, Wood lacked "that crucial imperfection that makes people interesting" and was "so gorgeous she often looks like the Platonic ideal of a gorgeous woman."

In a series of tweets this week, Wood shared Blasi's column and condemned the harsh body criticism women are subjected to, writing, "Look at the narratives that are assigned to women. Look at the way we make their looks their value or what makes them ‘interesting’"

Wood went on to say Blasi's column unfairly judged her, writing "Look at how they judge my life at 18 years old without giving a second thought as to what my situation might have been, look at the way they assume my posing was 4 them, to make them like me, instead of me just living my best life with 1 of my favorite photographers-"

Seeing the old photos brought up a wave of negative feelings for the actress, who wrote: "It just makes me really sad, thats all. That this is the respect we give women in the industry."

Blasi came across Wood's tweets and apologized, writing, "Hi. It’s me. You’re right. It was a terrible piece. I had no recollection of it and I wouldn’t write it now. I shouldn’t have done that to you or anyone and I’m sorry."

Wood was quick to accept the apology, writing "I think we all realize we’ve done things we wish we hadnt after we’ve grown, myself included. Thank you for the apology. How we repair is what matters sometimes."