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/ Source: TODAY
By Yi-Jin Yu

With the season in full swing, TODAY meteorologist Dylan Dreyer is ready to tackle spring cleaning during the 3rd hour of TODAY.

The nemesis this time of year is the dreaded closet, but with the help of organizational expert Laura Carlin, author of "Clutter-Free Parenting," no mess is too big to tackle.

Dylan has partnered with thredUP, an online consignment shop, to resell the clothes and accessories she isn’t wearing anymore. ThredUP offers “clean out bags” that you fill with any items you want to donate or sell secondhand and lists the items for you on their site. Once an item is accepted for resale, you can earn cash or credit in return.

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You can shop from Dylan’s closet directly on the thredUP website and 100% of sale proceeds will be donated to one of Dylan’s favorite charities, Girls Inc.

Here's a sneak peek at some of the items:

Reiss Dress

Dylan's red sheath dress adds a pop of color in any closet.ThredUp

This vibrant red dress features a v-neckline and sheath silhouette. It's perfect for warm spring days ahead.

Adrianna Papell Blouse

Dylan's purple blouse features a crew neckline and long sleeves.ThredUp

Add a purple punch to your work wardrobe with this long-sleeve blouse. This top pairs perfectly with your favorite pair of black pants.

Tabitha Skirt

Dylan's skirt features a printed pattern.ThredUp

This ivory skirt features a printed black pattern and a pencil silhouette. It's a stylish choice for any casual outfit.

And Dylan’s not the only one hit with the spring cleaning bug! Sheinelle Jones, Craig Melvin, and Al Roker are joining the spring cleaning action as well. Although thredUP does not accept men’s clothing, the website and app is making an exception to support the Girls Inc. cause.

Girls Inc. works directly with schools and cities across the United States and Canada to empower girls between the ages of 6-18. The nonprofit organization builds safe spaces, fosters mentorships and develops programming for girls and their families so they can grow up to be “strong, smart, and bold.” Girls Inc. also serves as an advocacy group, supporting legislation and policies that are dedicated to the development of young girls.