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 / Updated  / Source: TODAY
By Emily Sher

Curly-haired sisters, listen up: Stop flattening your beautiful locks to fit some preconceived notion of "good hair." There's simply no need to whip out a flatiron every time you'd like to look professional or primp for a formal event.

Need proof? TODAY.com enlisted help from Joseph Borokhov of Roman K Salon in New York City, who has been featured in The Knot for his curly-haired bridal updos. (Don't even know where to start? Joseph also spilled a few tips and tricks on how to maximize your curl potential.)

A professional and neat half-updo

So, you have a job interview or important meeting to attend — good for you! Don't get your curlicues in a bunch over your hairstyle; simply follow this four-step "knotting technique" to keep strands off of your face.

A romantic and formal side ponytail

Somewhere along the line, people started to think blowouts were the first step in an updo. Not true! In fact, your natural texture can add dimension and interest to your hairstyle.

Don't know where to start? Just follow these five simple steps:

1) Cleanse

  • Throw out your current shampoo (you heard us right!) and simply use your fingertips to massage your scalp with warm water. That's all you need!
  • If you really miss using a cleanser, be sure to choose a sulfate-free formula.

2) Hydrate

  • Consider conditioner your new best friend. Curly hair is naturally drier, so feel free to use a healthy amount.
  • Comb the product through each section of hair with your fingers.
  • Rinse lightly: You can even leave a bit of conditioner in your hair at the end of the shower.

3) Style

  • Product is key! Make sure to ask your stylist for a recommendation to find the right gel, mousse or styling cream for your hair type.
  • Evenly distribute the product while hair is still soaking wet so that it fully seeps into each strand.
  • Scrunch hair in an upward motion from ends to roots.
  • NEVER USE A BRUSH.

4) Set

  • Terry cloth (the fabric used in most towels) will break and damage your strands, which leads to the all-dreaded frizz.
  • Instead, use paper towel or even a T-shirt to soak up some of the moisture.

5) Finish