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Hasselback Maple and Apple Cider Roasted Squash

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Kimberly Tilsen-Brave Heart
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(4)

Ingredients

  • 1 large butternut squash or 2 to 3 small honeynut squash (about 3 pounds total)
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • kosher salt
  • freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/4 cup pure maple syrup, preferably grade B (local/Native preferred)
  • 3 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 1 tablespoon garlic powder
  • 2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
  • 6-8 dried bay leaves
  • Chef notes

    Using the hasselback technique on squash lets the flavor of the maple glaze permeate each and every bit. The result is a deeply flavorful dish that requires minimal effort and just a touch of time.

    Preparation

    1.

    Place a rack in upper third of oven; preheat to 425 F.

    2.

    Halve squash lengthwise and scoop out seeds with a large spoon. Using a peeler, remove skin and white flesh below (you should reach the deep orange flesh). Rub all over with oil and season with salt and pepper.

    3.

    Roast in a baking dish just large enough to hold halves side by side until beginning to soften (a paring knife should easily slip in only about 1/4 inch), 15 to 18 minutes.

    4.

    Meanwhile, place the maple syrup, butter, garlic and apple cider vinegar in a small saucepan over medium-high, stirring occasionally, until just thick enough to coat spoon, 6 to 8 minutes. Reduce heat to very low and keep glaze warm. Watch closely so it doesn't burn.

    5.

    Transfer squash to a cutting board and let cool slightly. Using a sharp knife, score rounded sides of squash halves crosswise, going as deep as possible but without cutting all the way through. Return squash to baking dish, scored sides up, and tuck bay leaves between a few of the slices; season with salt and pepper.

    6.

    Roast squash, basting with glaze every 10 minutes or so, using pastry brush to lift off any glaze in dish that is browning too much, until tender and glaze forms a rich brown coating, 45 to 60 minutes.