Here's where all of the engagement rings from failed 'Bachelor' relationships end up

One former winner is sharing the behind-the-scenes scoop.
The Bachelorette
Hannah Brown accepts Jed Wyatt's proposal during the season 15 finale of "The Bachelorette."Mark Bourdillion / ABC via Getty Images

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/ Source: TODAY
By Ronnie Koenig

Diamonds may last forever, but sadly not all relationships do — especially on "The Bachelor."

In the history of the long-running ABC reality show, only three of the final couples have gotten married (though even more marriages have come out of the spin-off show "Bachelor in Paradise"). So what happens to those gorgeous Neil Lane diamond engagement rings that the contestants propose with?

According to former "Bachelor" winner and "Bachelorette" star Becca Kufrin, there's a "ring graveyard" where producers store the rings from broken relationships

Kufrin revealed the behind-the-scenes tidbit on the "Bachelor Party" podcast earlier this week.

"I will say there is a ring graveyard," she explained on the Dec. 12 episode. "They get to keep them all locked away, hidden from everyone — all the scorned rings."

It's not too surprising the contestants don't get to keep the jewels — the custom-designed rings can be valued at up to $100,000.

Kufrin, who got engaged to "Bachelor" Arie Luyendyk Jr. on the season 22 finale, received a Neil Lane diamond ring and a rose, but returned the rock to Luyendyk when he famously dumped her on-camera in one of the show's most cringe-worthy episodes.

And while Kufrin said that she returned the ring because she didn't want a "pity diamond," it's been highly publicized that the show's contract stipulates that if a couple is not together a couple of years after the finale, the ring must be returned to the show.

Kufrin had a second chance at love when she returned as "The Bachelorette" and gave her final rose to medical sales rep Garrett Yrigoyen, who proposed to her on a trip to the Maldives with, yep, another Neil Lane sparkler.

Here's hoping this one stays far away from the "graveyard."