This Twitter account is ruthlessly judging celebrity homes on TV

Have you been judging the apartments and homes of TV show hosts and guests? You're not alone.
/ Source: TODAY

We all need a laugh right now. Look no further than this new Twitter account that popped up amid the coronavirus pandemic, judging the various nooks inside the apartments and homes of your favorite TV show hosts, news anchors and pundits.

Helmed by Claude Taylor, the "Room Rater" account lovingly reads to filth what we can see when hosts broadcast shows from home and guests call in remotely to talk shows and news programs. From Kristin Welker's 'soothing' living room to late-night host Jimmy Fallon's 'hobbit house,' Taylor has something to say about nearly every setting.

"Like a lot of people I am probably watching more cable news than I'd like and watching all of the talking heads and pundits. My girlfriend and I started this account to offer our insights," Taylor told TODAY.

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The 57-year-old from the Washington D.C. area is an avid social media user, as his personal account, which focuses on politics, has garnered more than 200,000 followers.

But this new account is really just meant to inspire a smile or a chuckle.

"We really just created this to have some lighthearted virus content," he said. "Just as a way to distract people and entertain them a bit. It's not really meant to be taken at all seriously. Just a little levity for the moment."

Who is his favorite so far? NBC News' John Heilemann's room, because he has "engaged a couple of times" with the ratings. "That's been fun," Taylor adds.

"I don't know squat about interior design. This is all make-believe. It's interesting because some actual designers, people who are actually in the business, have weighed in and I find that entertaining as well."

But while they're not professionals per se, some pundits are actually listening to reviews. MSNBC analyst Peter Baker was critiqued for having empty hooks on the wall with no pictures hanging from them. Later, he added two frames, one on a wall and one behind a door.

Taylor hopes people enjoy the account for what it is but he also hopes to bring awareness to a charity initiative from Mad Dog that is raising funds to "provide urgently needed supplies to U.S. hospitals" like masks, gloves and other PPE for health care workers.

"Room Rater really is just intended to be lighter fare," he explained. "Hopefully it provides a moment of distraction as we kind of look into the lives of the pundit class."