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Judy Collins says Joan Rivers supported her after her son died at 33

The comedy legend lent a helping hand to Collins when her son died by suicide.
Collins, 82, looks back on the kind gesture in a new interview and reveals the huge impact it had on her life. 
Collins, 82, looks back on the kind gesture in a new interview and reveals the huge impact it had on her life. Larry Busacca / Per Ole Hagen / Getty Images

If you or someone you know is considering suicide, please contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (8255), text “STRENGTH” to the Crisis Text Line at 741-741 or go to suicidepreventionlifeline.org.

When Judy Collins' only son died by suicide in 1992, Joan Rivers reached out to offer the singer her support.

Collins, 82, looks back on the kind gesture in a new interview with People and reveals the huge impact it had on her life.

“I was at my darkest after Clark’s death and had already started to pull the plug on everything," Collins explained.

But then the singer-songwriter got a call from the comedic icon, who had lost her husband — Edgar Rosenberg — to suicide a few years prior in 1987.

“I was going to cancel all my shows and put my career on hold, and she said, ‘You can’t stop working, because if you stop, you’ll never get out the other side,’" she recalled. "(Healing) is about therapy — and having people who can pull you up.”

Collins had once attempted suicide herself, and the loss of her 33-year-old son understandably hit her hard. But Rivers – who died in 2014 — was an unexpected bright light during an incredibly difficult time.

The industry veteran revealed that optimism also helped her make it through the trying experience. Collins said, “It’s necessary to get through dark things."

Therapy also helped Collins cope and she revealed that she's been seeing a therapist since she was in hear early 20s.

“Starting therapy at 23 was essential to me. I had to talk about (my) alcoholism, and I had to talk about (my) depression and (my) suicide attempt,” she said.

Over the years, Collins has been a staunch suicide prevention advocate and wrote a book in 2003 called "Sanity and Grace: A Journey of Suicide, Survival and Strength."

During her interview, the 82-year-old also emphasized how important it is to be open about mental health issues.

“Clark died 29 years ago now. It’s hard to think that it’s that long,” she said. “Get (these taboos) out into the open, whether it’s addiction or suicide.”