Oprah denies helping Prince Harry and Meghan Markle with major royal decision

The television legend denied a report claiming she helped advise the Duke and Duchess of Sussex on their decision to "step back" from the royal family.
/ Source: TODAY

Oprah Winfrey says she had nothing to do with Megxit.

The television legend has denied a report that she had a role in advising Prince Harry and Meghan, Duchess of Sussex, to take their stunning "step back" from being senior British royals earlier this week.

Winfrey issued a statement to TODAY in the wake of an article by The New York Post on Thursday that claimed she encouraged the royal couple to "break free" of the royal family and build their own brand by living in North America.

Oprah Winfrey says she did not play a role in advising Prince Harry and Meghan, Duchess of Sussex, to take a "step back" from being senior members of the British royal family. WireImage/ Getty Images

"Meghan and Harry do not need my help in figuring out what’s best for them,'' Winfrey said in her statement. "I care about them both and support whatever decisions they make for their family."

Their surprising announcement on Wednesday also stated their intentions to become financially independent and split their time living in Britain and North America, which fans and experts believe to mean Canada.

They recently spent Christmas in Canada with their baby son, Archie, rather than joining the royal family for the traditional ceremony with the queen at the Sandringham Estate in England.

The Duchess of Sussex also flew back to Canada a day after they dropped the bombshell about their plans to "step back," with Prince Harry remaining in the U.K. to sort out the couple's future with the royal family.

Winfrey has become close with the couple in the past few years, having attended their wedding in 2018 and teamed up with Harry for a documentary series on the Apple TV+ streaming service.

The documentary focuses on mental health issues, a cause Harry has strongly supported since speaking publicly about his own struggles following the tragic death of his mother, Princess Diana.

Winfrey spoke with TODAY's Jenna Bush Hager about the project on Monday.

"It came about because we were having a discussion about, 'What are the things that really matter to you in the world?'" Winfrey said. "And he said, 'climate change and mental wellness.' And I went, 'Oh, gee, me too.'

"And so from there the conversation went to, I said, 'I'm doing this thing for Apple.' And when I finished the conversation, he said, 'Oh, if you ever need any help with that Apple thing.' I go, 'Actually, I do.' Because would I have asked him? Probably not. So that's how that came about."

Winfrey also defended the royal couple's decision to keep the birth of their son a private affair in May, saying it was "a great thing."

In the wake of the couple's announcement on Wednesday, Queen Elizabeth II, Prince Charles and Prince William have instructed their aides to reach a "workable solution" for their future roles in the family.

The fallout has also been felt in subtle ways; Madame Tussauds London moved the wax statues of Harry and Meghan out of the royal family section and into a different part of the museum.

"Alongside the rest of the world we are reacting to the surprising news that the Duke and Duchess of Sussex will be stepping back as senior Royals," Steve Davies, general manager at Madame Tussauds London, said in a statement.