Kelly Clarkson flawlessly covers Amy Winehouse version of classic Carole King song

Yes... it's a cover of a cover!
/ Source: TODAY

Our favorite cover artist is back yet again with another cover of a cover!

Kelly Clarkson belted the classic Carole King tune "Will You Love Me Tomorrow?" but instead of performing the original composition, she opted for a version recorded by Amy Winehouse.

Also known as "Will You Still Love Me Tomorrow," King wrote the song with Gerry Goffin in 1960 for the girl group the Shirelles. They took the single to number one on the Billboard Hot 100 chart and it made history as the first song by a girl group to reach number one in the United States.

In 1971, King recorded the track for her iconic album "Tapestry," with Joni Mitchell and James Taylor providing additional background vocals. That album is one of the best-selling albums of all time, with over 25 million copies sold worldwide. In the United States, it was certified diamond by the RIAA, received four Grammy Awards, and in 2020, was ranked number 25 on Rolling Stone's list of the 500 greatest albums of all time.

After her death in 2011 at the age of 27, Winehouse posthumously released a compilation album titled "Lioness: Hidden Treasures" that featured her cover of the song. Produced by Mark Ronson, music critics hailed their new take.

"(Ronson's) melodramatic rendering of Carole King's 'Will You Still Love Me Tomorrow' toes the line between elegant and overblown, but better yet it's a shroud of pomp surrounding one of Winehouse's most delicately powerful vocals," wrote Pitchfork's Andrew Ryce. "When she breaks out into her best falsetto on the track's bridge, it's one of the few moments on 'Lioness' that feels truly, heartbreakingly poignant, enough to cut through its stodgy accompaniment."

This isn't the first time recently Clarkson has performed a cover of a song. Last month, when she hosted the Billboard Music Awards, she opened the show with a powerful performance of Whitney Houston's version of "Higher Love," a song written and originally recorded by Steve Winwood.