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Jim Morrison will live again in 'Doors' movie

What if Jim Morrison wasn't really dead? Where would The Doors frontman be today?Few people are better equipped to speculate on that than Morrison's former bandmate, Ray Manzarek. His 2001 novel, "The Poet in Exile," tackles that scenario, and now it's being turned into a movie.Publishers Weekly called the novel both "earnest" and "clumsy." In it, Manzarek imagines a version of himself receiving l
/ Source: TODAY.com

What if Jim Morrison wasn't really dead? Where would The Doors frontman be today?

Few people are better equipped to speculate on that than Morrison's former bandmate, Ray Manzarek. His 2001 novel, "The Poet in Exile," tackles that scenario, and now it's being turned into a movie.

Publishers Weekly called the novel both "earnest" and "clumsy." In it, Manzarek imagines a version of himself receiving letters from a fictionalized Morrison who's now living as a family man in the Seychelles. Reviews on Amazon.com are mixed, with one reader saying "Manzarek has Morrison apologize (over and over) for how poorly he treated the other band members."

In a press release about the upcoming movie, Manzarek doesn't sound quite so self-obsessed as that reviewer makes him out to be. “The number one question I get asked is, ‘Do you think Jim Morrison’s really dead?’” he's quoted as saying. “All I can say is, I personally have not seen or heard from Jim since he left for Paris 40 years ago. And I miss that guy. He was a poet. A Dionysus to my Apollo. A great performer, a shaman. And a damn good friend."

Tim Sullivan will write and direct the film with Manzarek as a producer. Sullivan has an interesting background with some horror and retro elements, including producer titles on "Snoop Dogg's Hood of Horror" and the upcoming "Chillerama."

The film is expected to film in 2012 and be released in 2013. It's too early for any casting information, but for our money, it'll be tough for an actor to create as believable an onscreen Morrison as Val Kilmer did in Oliver Stone's 1991 film. Of course, this Morrison isn't supposed to be the real deal, so an actor could have a little more flexibility with the role. People are strange, that's for sure.

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Gael Fashingbauer Cooper is TODAY.com's movies editor.