Jenna Bush Hager shares about 'sisterhood' with other daughters of presidents

She says the connection is real and endures.
LB, Jenna, Barbara and GWB welcome Michelle Obama, her mother, Marian Robinson, and her children Malia and Sasha to a tour of the White House   Tuesday, Nov. 18, 2008 in Washington, D.C.
Jenna helped Malia and Sasha Obama, along with their mother and grandmother, tour the White House in November 2008.Joyce N. Boghosian / White House Photo
/ Source: TODAY
By Drew Weisholtz

As one of the few people who can say she's the child of a president, Jenna Bush Hager is a member of one of the most exclusive clubs in America. And it’s a role that has bonded her to the other first children.

While appearing Tuesday night on the “Watch What Happens Live” after show, Jenna was asked by host Andy Cohen if she has any sort of relationship with the other kids of former presidents.

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“We really do, in some ways. We reach out to each other,” she said.

“Chelsea (Clinton) and I see each other around, or we used to. Now, I don’t see anybody. But we used to see each other around New York City. And I reach out to the Obama girls and vice versa. But we do.”

Jenna said the women are grouped together because of how unique the experience is.

During their November 2018 tour of the White House, Jenna showed Sasha and Malia the ropes.Joyce N. Boghosian / White House Photo

“There is a sisterhood because it’s so few of us that we know what it’s like and the beauty of it and living history and also some of the difficulties,” she said.

The relationships they’ve formed have been warm and friendly.

Jenna and twin sister Barbara welcomed Sasha and Malia Obama to the White House after Barack Obama won the presidency in November 2008. When his second term was winding down in 2017, Jenna and Barbara wrote his daughters a letter, reminiscing about that initial tour.

“When you slid down the banister of the solarium, just as we had done as 8-year-olds and again as 20-year-olds chasing our youth, your joy and laughter were contagious,” they wrote.

Being a first child comes with preconceived notions about who you are as a person, according to Jenna.

“It's kind of hard to tell what people think about you,'' she told Cohen while appearing on his show in February.

"It's hard to tell what people think about me, but I think probably maybe that I'm not a hard worker. I try to fight against that a little."