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Jagger: NFL made Motown mistake but fixed it

Mick Jagger famously sang: “You Can’t Always Get What You Want.”But Detroit has gotten what it wanted — some Motown flavor at the Super Bowl.The lead singer of the Rolling Stones said Thursday that the NFL erred by not initially announcing that any Detroit-themed musical acts would perform at the game.“They made a mistake, but they rectified it,” Jagger said.Jagger, Keith Richards and
/ Source: The Associated Press

Mick Jagger famously sang: “You Can’t Always Get What You Want.”

But Detroit has gotten what it wanted — some Motown flavor at the Super Bowl.

The lead singer of the Rolling Stones said Thursday that the NFL erred by not initially announcing that any Detroit-themed musical acts would perform at the game.

“They made a mistake, but they rectified it,” Jagger said.

Jagger, Keith Richards and their bandmates drew an overflow crowd for their news conference, a far bigger turnout than the Seahawks and Steelers attracted earlier in the day.

And the Rolling Stones were as entertaining as ever.

Commanding the room, Jagger knew exactly what he was doing. He casually slipped in an expletive while discussing Janet Jackson’s infamous “wardrobe malfunction,” joked about Aretha Franklin stripping down on stage and even sang a few notes.

The tone wasn’t quite as jovial in the weeks leading up to Sunday’s game at Ford Field as some Detroiters — including Franklin — complained that the city’s Motown legacy had been snubbed.

So Jagger was asked whether the Stones would do anything during their performance to honor Detroit.

“Do you mean, are we going to do a Marvin Gaye tune?” he kidded.

Earlier in the day, Stevie Wonder — who will be performing before the kickoff — said any controversy had been put to rest.

Before any reporter could ask a question, Wonder lifted his microphone up and said: “If we didn’t want the Stones, we wouldn’t be here. We want the Stones.”

“They even recorded two of my songs,” he said with a smile.

Wonder will play a 12-minute set before the game, and Franklin will team on the national anthem with singer Aaron Neville, keyboardist Dr. John and a 150-member Detroit-based choir.

Later, Richards — known almost as much for his years of hard living as his guitar playing — chimed in. Mumbled, really.

After doing a craggy impression of Ed Sullivan, Richards later did a takeoff on an old, oft-repeated joke — the one that if there was a nuclear holocaust, the only living things left would be cockroaches and Richards.

What he would do in that case? “I’m gonna eat ’em!” he said.

Don Mischer, who serves as the executive producer and director of the halftime show, said the Stones would perform on a 5,800-square foot stage that will arrive in 35 pieces. It will be rolled into place on the field by 350 volunteers who have five minutes to set it up and five minutes to take it down.

The Stones’ 2002 concert at Ford Field was one of the first events at the indoor stadium.

The other members of the band — drummer Charlie Watts and guitarist Ron Wood — appeared at the news conference but didn’t have much to say.

Jagger said he didn’t follow American football much these days, but recalled Lynn Swann’s Super Bowl exploits.

Wonder, a 21-time Grammy winner who was born in Saginaw, will join with singers John Legend, India.Arie and Joss Stone for the pregame show. They are expected to perform some of Wonder’s hits, as well as some other Motown standards.

Neville said he was thrilled at the opportunity to perform alongside Detroit’s own “Queen of Soul.”

“I’m like a schoolboy about it,” he said. “I have butterflies.”

Neville, a New Orleans native, predicted the anthem would be a “bit of New Orleans and Motown mixed together.”

Franklin talked about how excited she was to finally perform in a Super Bowl show in her hometown. She missed the other one that was nearby — the 1982 game played at the Pontiac Silverdome.

And she had a good reason.

“I never knew it came the first time,” she said.