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Hugh Grant's role in shuttering News of the World

On Thursday, it was announced that James' Murdoch's News of the World would be shutting down amid a phone-hacking scandal. Among those who helped bring down the tabloid? Actor Hugh Grant, who'd been a victim of alleged hacking by the publication.In an interview with the BBC, Grant recalled an incident where an ex-News of the World features editor, Paul McMullan, snapped photos of him, and in the
Darren Gerrish / Getty Images Contributor

On Thursday, it was announced that James' Murdoch's News of the World would be shutting down amid a phone-hacking scandal. Among those who helped bring down the tabloid? Actor Hugh Grant, who'd been a victim of alleged hacking by the publication.

In an interview with the BBC, Grant recalled an incident where an ex-News of the World features editor, Paul McMullan, snapped photos of him, and in the course of doing so, "he starting boasting how my phone had been hacked, and all the dirtiest tactics of the News of the World" Grant told the BBC. "I was revolted and astonished."

A few months later, Grant visited the pub McMullan owned, and recorded him talking about the paper's tactics. Grant had the story published in the New Statesman.

During the live interview with Grant, McMullan was on hand and concurred with Grant's account of what happened and called the incident "hilarious."

"How can Hugh Grant coming in your pub with a silly little pen trying to record you be anything other than hilarious? I didn't mind being turned over," he said.

The exchange between Grant and McMullan turned more contentious though. Grant confronted McMullan saying, "(the hacking) was a widespread practice. You guys had no morals, no scruples at all. You didn't care who got hurt, as long as you were able to sell your newspaper for a lot of money. Your only motive was profit. You're not a journalist, you have no interest in journalism, it's just money, money money." 

McMullan's retort: "Our interest was writing truthful stories, and what better source of the truth than what you can find on someone's mobile?"

What do you think of McMullan's claim, as well as the downfall of the venerable English tabloid. Share your thoughts on Facebook.

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