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Hank Williams Jr.'s daughters injured in wreck

Two daughters of Hank Williams Jr. remained hospitalized after being badly injured in a one-vehicle wreck in northern Mississippi.Hilary Williams, 27, underwent eight hours of emergency surgery at the Regional Medical Center on Wednesday night. She had a second operation Thursday to reconstruct her hip and repair damage to her colon, said the country singer’s publicist, Kirt Webster.Her sister,
/ Source: The Associated Press

Two daughters of Hank Williams Jr. remained hospitalized after being badly injured in a one-vehicle wreck in northern Mississippi.

Hilary Williams, 27, underwent eight hours of emergency surgery at the Regional Medical Center on Wednesday night. She had a second operation Thursday to reconstruct her hip and repair damage to her colon, said the country singer’s publicist, Kirt Webster.

Her sister, Holly, 25, was in stable but critical condition with broken wrists, a broken leg, cuts and bruises, Webster said.

Like their father and grandfather, country legend Hank Williams, both women are musicians. Holly Williams released her debut album in 2004.

The sisters were on their way to a family funeral in Louisiana when Hilary lost control of her Toyota 4-Runner and it flipped over several times, said Staff Sgt. Scott Swanson, a spokesman for the Mississippi Highway Patrol. No other vehicles were involved.

The wreck happened Wednesday afternoon on U.S. 61 just north of Dundee, Miss., about 45 miles south of Memphis, Tunica County sheriff’s officials said.

The sisters, who were wearing seat belts, were taken by helicopter to the hospital. Swanson said troopers are still investigating, but there is no indication that drugs or alcohol contributed to the accident. He said weather wasn’t a factor.

Hank Williams Jr., 56, has had a string of hits, including “Family Tradition” and “All My Rowdy Friends Are Coming Over Tonight.”

In 1975, he fell off a Montana mountain while hunting, suffering head injuries that required a year of recovery. Afterward, he wore a beard and sunglasses to hide the scars.

His father, a star in the early 1950s, had hits such as “Your Cheatin’ Heart” and “I’m So Lonesome I Could Cry.” He died Jan. 1, 1953, when Hank Jr. was 3.