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How to watch the 2021 Grammy Awards

The ceremony has been postponed to March.
/ Source: TODAY

The entertainment industry is still in semi-lockdown mode, but there's at least one thing for certain when it comes to the 2021 Grammy Awards: The show must go on.

Right now, the specifics are hard to come by, but bookmark this space: We'll be updating it over the next couple of weeks as we learn even more! Naturally, we'll be on hand to mark all the amazing fashion, including any incredible nail art and exciting performances — but for now, here's everything we know about how you can watch this year's biggest night in music.

A gold-plated Grammy Award, which depicts a gilded gramophone, from the 1996 ceremony. Michael Ochs Archives / Getty Images

What are the Grammy Awards?

Presented by the Recording Academy, the Grammy Awards have recognized singular achievements in the music industry since 1959.

Why is the award shaped like that?

The Grammy is a miniature gilded gramophone (an old-fashioned record player with a speaker known as a "sound horn" attached to the device), the first mass device to be able to play traditional wax, then vinyl records. The award weighs five pounds and is made of a custom metal alloy called grammium, according to the New York Times. The cabinet and tone arm are plated in 24-karat gold.

Billie Eilish was the big winner at the 2020 Grammy Awards, held last January. Rachel Luna / FilmMagic

When are the awards happening?

The 63rd Annual Grammy Awards will be held on Sunday, March 14, following a postponement. According to an early February report by Variety, the ceremony will be held in the outdoor section of L.A.'s Convention Center — possibly in the open plaza known as L.A. Live — with the Staples Center (where it usually is held) as a backdrop. There'll be no audience, but rather a small amount of media and a red carpet is planned. And segments could be shot in multiple locations, including the venue's roof, or in loading bays.

All of this is subject to change; word from Recording Academy Interim President/CEO Harvey Mason Jr. last June was that they had three plans in motion: a traditional show with a full crowd, one with a limited crowd, and one with no crowd. In September Mason also noted that the show would be fully live, and feature no pre-recorded statements.

What about all that controversy I read about?

Both Halsey and the Weeknd took to social media shortly after the nominations to express criticism with the whole process. Both artists were shut out of the nominations this year. Then Tiffany Haddish revealed on Twitter that she'd been offered the hosting slot but with no compensation.

How can I watch?

The awards will be broadcast starting at 8 p.m. ET on CBS and CBS All Access; the premiere ceremony, where the bulk of the 83 category awards are given out, will be streamed live on Grammy.com starting at 3 p.m. ET. (But remember, that information is subject to change.)

Trevor Noah will be this year's Grammy Awards host. Jim Spellman / WireImage

Who's hosting?

"The Daily Show" host Trevor Noah, who was nominated in 2020 for a Grammy, is stepping up to host the awards.

"Despite the fact that I am extremely disappointed that the Grammys have refused to have me sing or be nominated for best pop album, I am thrilled to be hosting this auspicious event," Noah said in a statement. "I think as a one-time Grammy nominee, I am the best person to provide a shoulder to all the amazing artists who do not win on the night because I too know the pain of not winning the award! (This is a metaphorical shoulder, I'm not trying to catch Corona.) See you at the 63rd Grammys!"

Who's nominated?

Here's the full list of nominees; Beyoncé leads with nine.

Who'll be performing?

Right now, your guess is as good as ours. Stay tuned, though: We should hear very soon! But since Ben Winston (best known for co-creating "Carpool Karaoke" on "The Late Late Show with James Corden") has taken over executive producing from long-time producer Ken Ehrlich, we expect there might be a little vehicle-based musical shenanigans. Just guessing, though.

What's new this year?

Aside from the presentation, there's plenty going on behind the scenes; several awards have been re-named (like best urban contemporary album, which is now best progressive R&B album) and there's no longer a specific number of releases keeping artists from entering the best new artist category.

More coming as we learn it! Watch this space.