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Factbox: Key facts about TV producer Dick Clark

(Reuters) - Television producer Dick Clark, whose long-running dance show "American Bandstand" helped rock 'n' roll win acceptance in mainstream America in the 1960s, died on Wednesday at the age of 82.
/ Source: Reuters

(Reuters) - Television producer Dick Clark, whose long-running dance show "American Bandstand" helped rock 'n' roll win acceptance in mainstream America in the 1960s, died on Wednesday at the age of 82.

Following are some key facts about Clark:

* The first network TV show to feature rock 'n' roll, "American Bandstand" first aired nationally in 1957 and ran until 1987. It won over America with its non-threatening image and gave legends such as Chuck Berry, Jerry Lee Lewis and Buddy Holly their first national exposure.

* Clark was also producer or host of dozens of other radio and TV shows, including the annual Golden Globe awards, game shows "Pyramid" and "Scattergories," "Dick Clark's New Year's Rockin' Eve," and oldies radio show "Rock, Roll & Remember." In 1973, he created the annual American Music Awards show as an alternative to the Grammys.

* Clark's youthful good looks, which he maintained into his 70s, won him the nickname of "America's oldest teenager."

* Clark suffered a serious stroke in 2004 that left his speech impaired. He returned to host his "New Year's Rockin' Eve" show in 2005 along with "American Idol" host Ryan Seacrest.

* Clark was born in Mount Vernon, New York, in November 1929 and got his start working in the mail room of a radio station before attending university and landing a job as a TV announcer.

(Reporting By Jill Serjeant; Editing by Cynthia Osterman)