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Milkshake it Off: Dancers in inflatable-cow costumes bust a moo-ve in supermarkets

If you've ever gone grocery shopping and thought, "I wish a dancer in an inflatable cow costume would shake it to some hot beats in the freezer aisle," you're either a little odd, or you're familiar with a recent trend of inflatable-cow mascots dancing in supermarkets.Although dancers in these cow costumes have been around for quite some time, as evidenced by a hypnotic video posted Aug. 3, 2013,
Dancing cow
Gratia Forensi Equus / YouTube

If you've ever gone grocery shopping and thought, "I wish a dancer in an inflatable cow costume would shake it to some hot beats in the freezer aisle," you're either a little odd, or you're familiar with a recent trend of inflatable-cow mascots dancing in supermarkets.

Gratia Forensi Equus / Today

Although dancers in these cow costumes have been around for quite some time, as evidenced by a hypnotic video posted Aug. 3, 2013, videos of the dancing mascots have taken the Internet by storm this past week.

Last Thursday, a YouTube user posted the video, "The supermarket cow dance," which featured a Holstein-Freisian-cattle mascot flailing to a Nene Malo remix while shoppers milled about the store, unfazed. That video collected almost 2 million views in a single week.

The trend continued — and the stakes were raised — Saturday, when a newer YouTube video showcased a popping-and-locking mascot with warp-speed moves. After emerging from a lair of potato chips with the mascot's arms and head tucked in, the dancer dramatically reveals the costume's right arm, then the left, then the head, before unleashing rapid-fire shimmies that might defy several laws of physics. That video already has nearly a quarter-million views, and has been making the rounds on Facebook.

At the moment, Mexico seems to have the stronghold on the dancing-inflatable-cow market, as all of the choreographed mascots in these videos sport the logo of Mexican dairy company Alpura. But it may not be long before you have to salsa your way past a dancing mascot to get to the salsa.

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