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Charlize Theron compares intrusive press coverage to rape

Trying to maintain a private life and personal boundaries is tough for any public figure, but according to Charlize Theron, it's more than just tough. The actress recently spoke out against the media, comparing what she considers to be intrusive press coverage to rape.In an interview with U.K. news outlet Sky News, Theron listened as a reporter read off a list of headlines about her gathered durin
Image: Charlize Theron
Frazer Harrison / Getty Images

Trying to maintain a private life and personal boundaries is tough for any public figure, but according to Charlize Theron, it's more than just tough. The actress recently spoke out against the media, comparing what she considers to be intrusive press coverage to rape.

In an interview with U.K. news outlet Sky News, Theron listened as a reporter read off a list of headlines about her gathered during a Google search. The headlines weren't negative, but they were personal, touching on intimate topics such as Theron's son, love life, and appearance. The reporter then asked Theron how she feels about such media attention.

"I don't (Google myself), so that's my saving grace," she said. "I think it's when you start living in that world, and doing that, you start … I guess … feeling raped."

As Theron nodded for emphasis, the reporter asked if she really felt that strongly about the issue.

"Well, you know, when it comes to your son and your private life — maybe it's just me," she said. "Some people might relish in all that (media interest) but there are certain things in my life that I think of as very sacred, and I am very protective over them."

In 2010, "Twilight" star Kristen Stewart made a similar statement, telling ELLE U.K. that viewing paparazzi photos makes her feel like she's "looking at someone being raped." Stewart later apologized for what she called "a big mistake" in her choice of words.

Theron stood by her own comparison during the sit-down with Sky News, adding that while she might not "always win that war" when it comes to a prying press, she's found a way to cope.

"As long as I don't have to see that stuff or read that stuff or hear that stuff then I can live with my head in a clear space," she said. "That's probably a lot healthier than living in that little dark room."