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/ Source: TODAY
By Rheana Murray

A 10-year-old boy’s dream came true when he met his idol Monday night: Adam Levine from Maroon 5.

Christopher Warner, who has Down syndrome, hardly ever stops talking about—or singing—the band’s music, one of his teachers at West Friendship Elementary School in Maryland told TODAY.com.

“He has just been fascinated with Maroon 5 and especially Adam Levine,” said Avery Stanert, a special education teacher at the school. “He loves to listen to their music during work breaks. He draws pictures of them. He just absolutely loves them.”

So she created a video of Christopher gushing about Levine and singing the band’s hits, which went viral on YouTube and was picked up by local news stations. It eventually wound up in the hands of radio hosts at Hot 99.5’s The Kane Show, days before the band was set to play nearby in Washington, D.C.

“They arranged for backstage passes and tickets,” Stanert said. “They immediately called the record label and worked it all out.”

Christopher and his mom, Cecilia Warner, along with Stanert and three other teachers, got the VIP treatment Monday night, heading to dinner before the Maroon 5 concert at Verizon Center. “He stayed awake for the whole thing. I was impressed. He was just so excited,” Stanert said.

But when Christopher was finally face-to-face with Levine backstage after the show, he panicked and suddenly became shy, hiding behind his mom and crouching down onto the floor. Levine handled it in the best possible way—by suggesting everyone else get on the floor, too.

Stanert said she and a colleague started making Christopher’s video about two months ago, filming clips here and there, whenever Christopher launched into song or started talking about Levine’s tattoos. Christopher’s brother Michael also appears in the viral clip.

“He’s a typical 10-year-old boy,” Stanert said. “He loves music, he loves drawing, he loves his friends. He’s just a very caring, really amazing boy. And so is his twin brother. His whole family is really great.”

“We’ve been really happy to see how Down syndrome has gotten a lot of attention for this,” she added. “Kids with Down syndrome are just like their peers.”

This article was originally published Mar. 3, 2015 at 5:45 p.m. ET.