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/ Source: TODAY
By Aliyah Frumin

A video of a 4-year-old boy singing “Remember Me” from the movie Coco to an alter dedicated to his late baby sister is tugging on the heartstrings of tens of thousands of people.

Samir Deais of San Antonio took to Twitter on Dec. 30 to share the video, which has since gone viral. It shows his stepson, Alex Vasquez, playing a toy guitar while singing the song from the Disney movie. Alex was singing on what would have been his baby sister Ava’s first birthday.

Deais told TODAY that soon after Ava was born, she was diagnosed with hydronephrosis, a condition that causes kidneys to swell due to excess urine. She died when she was just 4 months old.

Ava Deais. She was diagnosed with a kidney disorder soon after she was born and died at 4 months old. Courtesy of Samir Deais

“My wife captured the moment when she was cleaning nearby,” said Deais, a 24-year-old car salesman. “…Instantly tears came to my eyes. It’s wonderful to see how much he loves his baby sister. He also gives her goodnight kisses at the alter every night and asks her to give him in a kiss in the middle of the night when he’s sleeping as well.”

Deais explained that Alex saw “Coco” twice in the theater and listens to the soundtrack nearly every day. The movie, which is about Mexico's Day of the Dead holiday to remember those who have passed away, has helped his son cope with the tragedy.

After he sang the song, “Alex told me that he was practicing for her birthday,” his mother, Stephanie Deais, told TODAY. “I told him that would make Ava smile…I couldn’t hold back the tears.”

Samir and Stephanie Deais with their children, Alex and Ava. Ava died on May 1, 2017.Courtesy of Samir Deais.

The video has more than 1.4 million views on Twitter and it has garnered more than 142,000 favorites. Hundreds more commenters have offered their support to the family in the comments section.

“There have been so many people who have messaged my wife and I, people who have opened up about their own losses,” said Deais. “It makes us feel that we’re not alone and that the feelings that we feel are okay.”