Parents

The ultrasound was wrong... it's a boy! Watch this family's surprise

If your entire family expected the arrival of a baby girl, but a boy was born instead, this might be exactly how they'd react.

Kyle and Danielle Williams of Belleville, Michigan, were shocked themselves when the newborn they were told would be their second daughter turned out to be their first son. The ultrasound that had predicted the gender months earlier was wrong – very wrong.

So one by one, they let their loved ones in on the surprise at the hospital and filmed their reactions, starting with one of the grandparents: Danielle’s mother. The couple asked Linda Monday-Jones to change the baby’s diaper and her reaction when she realizes it's a boy is priceless.

Bentley Thomas Williams — who was supposed to be named Charlee — was born via cesarean section on March 3. Kyle Williams, who had been up for 24 hours during his wife's labor, still remembers the moment he first saw the baby as he looked over the drapes.

“I was speechless and wasn't sure if my eyes were playing tricks on me or not,” Kyle Williams, 32, told TODAY Parents.

“I didn't tell my wife. All I could say was there's a bit of a surprise.”

When the doctor announced it was a boy, Danielle’s reaction was total disbelief, Kyle recalled. She kept asking if everyone was serious.

“But she was thrilled when they brought him around to her to see him for the first time. The look of pure happiness on her face was amazing,” Kyle said.

Early on, Danielle was convinced she was expecting a boy, but an ultrasound performed when she was 20 weeks along in October revealed the baby was a girl.

With proper expertise and equipment, ultrasounds can correctly predict the gender of the baby 95 percent of the time, said Dr. Iffath Hoskins, vice chair of patient safety and quality in the department of obstetrics and gynecology at NYU Langone Medical Center. They're especially good at predicting a boy.

But factors such as the position of baby, the experience of the sonographer and the quality of the machine can influence the accuracy, she noted.

"There is always a disclaimer with ultrasounds that nothing is 100 percent and that there is always the possibility, albeit small, that something was misidentified," Hoskins said.

The couple wasn’t hoping for any specific gender, just a healthy baby, Kyle said. They have a 2-year-old daughter, Peyton, who has Diamond Blackfan Anemia, a rare bone marrow disorder. The family has set up a webpage to tell her story and bring awareness about DBA.

As they awaited the birth of their second daughter, they bought more pink baby clothes and Danielle created more handmade blankets and head bands for a baby girl. They held off painting the nursery, however, which turned out to be a fortunate turn of events.

Peyton, who was expecting a baby sister, is thrilled about her brother, Kyle said. Just to make the transition a bit easier, her parents gave her a baby girl doll in the hospital room and named her Charlee, they name they picked out for her sister.

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