'I hope one of y'all pick me': Thousands apply to adopt 9-year-old boy after viral video

"God my heart. I hope someone takes him in," one person commented on Jordan's story.
/ Source: TODAY

Jordan, a 9-year-old Oklahoma boy, broke hearts across the country when he told viewers, "I hope one of y'all pick me," in a recent local news story about his adoption journey.

As a result, Oklahoma's Department of Human Services has been overwhelmed with inquiries from people wanting to give Jordan, who's been in foster care for six years, a forever home. In the first 12 hours after the story aired this past week, the agency received 5,000 web inquiries from people all over the country, Casey White, communications administrator at Oklahoma's DHS, told TODAY.

White explained that Jordan's story was part of a local NBC affiliate's series highlighting kids waiting to be adopted. The DHS has had difficulty placing many of the featured kids, often due to physical or behavioral health needs.

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Jordan has a younger brother who's already been adopted.

"Jordan has had struggles while in foster care. Now he’s older. He’s adorable. He really wants a family. He sees his brother has found that," White said.

In the original story on Oklahoma's News 4, Jordan told his interviewer that if he could go anywhere in the world, it would be "an adoption party for a home." When asked what three wishes he'd like to have granted, Jordan said, "Family, family and family ... I would just like to have a family to call mom and dad or just mom or just dad. I don’t really care."

"I could have some people to talk to anytime I need to,” he added. "I hope one of y’all pick me."

Comments on the story capture how heart-wrenching it was to learn about Jordan's experience.

"God my heart. I hope someone takes him in," wrote one.

"How would I get into contact with the adoption center. We are a family of three that would adopt him (tomorrow)," added another.

"I filled out the form. I would love to bring him home," commented a third.

White said she hopes that the interest in the story will inspire people to consider the many other children in foster care in the state and across the U.S.

"When a situation like this happens and a story about a child goes viral, sometimes families are only interested in that child," she said, stressing that "there are a lots of other kiddos who need families."

"I really hope if people are compelled by Jordan’s story, that they will remember he is not alone," she said. "Our foster families are critical to helping kids heal. If he warmed your heart, there is probably a reason you called."

If you're interested in adopting, contact your local human services department or visit AdoptUSkids.org, White said.