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Staying power: Older moms aim to live longer

Those having kids in their 40s, 50s take steps to be there for big milestones When Stacey Bartlett-Knettler decided to get pregnant at 38, she didn’t worry much about her age. She felt young and healthy, and ready to start a family. But by the time she was 42 and had given birth to her second baby, the Columbus, Ohio, executive was starting to worry about her own mortality. She wondered if s

Those having kids in their 40s, 50s take steps to be there for big milestones When Stacey Bartlett-Knettler decided to get pregnant at 38, she didn’t worry much about her age. She felt young and healthy, and ready to start a family. But by the time she was 42 and had given birth to her second baby, the Columbus, Ohio, executive was starting to worry about her own mortality. She wondered if she and her husband would be there for the babies’ important milestones. “We would talk about where we would be when they were 20 or 30 or 40,” Bartlett-Knettler, now 45, says. “Will we see them get married? Will we see our grandbabies? Will we be there to see what kind of contribution they make in the world?” Bartlett-Knettler figured the only way she could extend her life span and be there for her kids’ landmark moments was to focus on her health. She got more regular about her exercise program and soon was in the best shape she’d ever been in. She pestered her husband, Chris, to get yearly physicals and to take better care of himself, too. “We’ve got children now,” she told him. “Don’t leave me with the children to raise all by myself.”... Read the full story and share your thoughts below. Related stories:Older moms aim to live longer