Watch this correspondent get adorably interrupted by son on live TV

NBC News' Courtney Kube found herself multitasking when her son Ryan, 4, walked into the middle of a live interview.

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/ Source: TODAY
By Scott Stump

First, there was BBC Dad. Now meet MSNBC Mom.

NBC News correspondent Courtney Kube had her own viral moment of being adorably interrupted during a live segment on MSNBC Wednesday morning when her son Ryan, 4, snuck behind her as she was speaking about the serious issue of Turkish air strikes in northern Syria.

"Excuse me, my kids are here," she said on air while smiling as her son grasped for her attention. "Live television."

Kube, 41, took her public parenting moment in stride, eventually steering Ryan off camera while a graphic replaced the live shot of her for a few seconds.

"As soon as I realized he was standing next to me, for a second your heart kind of stops," Kube told TODAY. "I almost picked him up and put him on my lap, but I was afraid he would lean back against mic.

"I was so glad he didn't start crying. He was smiling and happy. It could've been worse!"

Kube's moment with her son brought memories of Robert Kelly, the professor who became known as BBC Dad in 2017 when his two young children hilariously barged into a live interview he was giving on the BBC about the ouster of South Korean president Park Geun-hye.

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Ryan and his twin brother, Jackson, were with Kube at NBC's Washington bureau for a few hours in the morning before she was going to drop them off at preschool because her husband, Eric Dent, was out of town.

"He called me and apologized,'' Kube said about her husband. "He's like, 'I'm so sorry,' but sort of laughing and saying, 'Is everyone mad? Are you OK?'''

The boys have accompanied her to work before for breaking news or weekend segments. On New Year's Eve last year, they sat and ate hamburgers while Kube reported on the breaking news regarding the resignation of Gen. James Mattis as Secretary of Defense.

"There's just some mornings and evenings that don't work,'' Kube said. "Sometimes you can't always get a sitter at the last minute or my husband is out of town."

The twins usually sit with their coloring books in the newsroom, but on Wednesday Ryan wanted to pay mom a visit while she was on air while Jackson stayed put.

"There's nothing you can do,'' she said. "I was just glad no one was upset about it. It's a serious issue to have a little kid walk up in the middle of it, but the reality is it's live TV."

Many of Kube's news colleagues and MSNBC viewers were impressed by her on-air multitasking as she corralled her son while continuing the interview.

"The hardest part is that as soon as you bring kids into the workplace, everyone gives them candy and chocolate, so they get all sugared up,'' Kube said while laughing. "People are really supportive of it. Most of the time the boys are not seen or heard."

Kelly had a similar moment during his BBC interview two years ago when his daughter, Marion, who was 4 at the time, burst into his office with a "hippity-hoppity" strut that quickly became internet shorthand for confidently entering a room.

Kelly's son James then rolled in behind her before Kelly's wife, Kim Jung-A, scrambled to corral the toddlers and hustle them out of the room.

The professor kept his composure through the whole scene, much like Kube managed to do on Wednesday. She thought she might be able to pull off the segment without an interruption.

"I couldn't see (my son) because he was walking straight and he's little, but then I noticed one of the tech guys lunging under the desk," Kube said. "I look to the side and there he was.

"I was so close to a clean getaway."