Mom with ovarian cancer lets daughter, 4, give her a chemo hair cut

Emile Orton wanted to ease her kids into her baldness.

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/ Source: TODAY
By Rachel Paula Abrahamson

Last summer, when Emilie Orton was diagnosed with stage 2 ovarian cancer, her oncologist shared some advice about hair loss.

“Right before I started chemo, my doctor said, ‘remember this is emotional for your kids too. You’re not the only one going through it,’” Orton, 32, told TODAY Parents. “He suggested I find a way to involve them.”

Though Orton was anxious to shave her head, she wanted to ease her children into the idea of a bald mom. So, the Utah mother of three enlisted her 4-year-old daughter Norah to be her stylist.

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The preschooler grabbed her scissors.

“Norah is so into hair stuff. She’ll notice details like someone’s glittery eye shadow,” Orton explained. “She doesn’t get it from me.”

Orton shared a video of the chop to Instagram, with her own funny commentary. “I’m kind of scared for my ear’s life,” Orton quipped at one point.

“It was way more happy and positive than I could have ever imagined. You can make funny things out of sad situations,” Orton revealed. "Norah was so pleased with herself. She wanted to keep going."

Emilie Orton and her husband, Nick Orton, with their kids, Norah, Cole and Remi. Courtesy of Emilie Orton

Orton was inundated with praise on Instagram. "She's going to became a world known hairstylist! Good job. Mom you’re amazing,” wrote one person. Added another: "I just love this so much. Helping the kids understand all of this at the same time you are."

Orton’s 7-year-old son Cole who was struggling with the idea of his mother losing her hair, had a good laugh when she showed him Norah's work.

Orton dressed up as Mr. Clean for chemo on Halloween.Courtesy of Emilie Orton

“If you were anyone above age 4, you knew it looked horrible,” Orton admitted.

Orton is due to finish chemotherapy on Christmas Eve and her prognosis is good.

“Then, hopefully it's gone,” she told TODAY Parents. “Hopefully, I’m cured."