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Meet the 7 sets of siblings competing at Tokyo Olympics

No sibling rivalry here — they're all on Team USA.
/ Source: TODAY

There are 613 members of Team USA, and at least fourteen of them share DNA. It's clear athleticism runs in the family for Phillip and Ryan Chew (badminton), Aria and Makenzie Fischer (water polo), Courtney and Kelley Hurley (fencing), Jessica and Nelly Korda (golf), Henry and Jackson Leverett (shooting), Kristie and Samantha Mewis (soccer), and Erik and Kawika Shoji (volleyball), who are all competing in this year's Olympic Games.

While competition has only just begun in Japan, here are the seven sets of siblings who are going for gold at the Tokyo Olympics:

Phillip and Ryan Chew

Phillip Chew (L) and Ryan Chew of the United States compete in the Men's Doubles first round match against Lee Yang and Wang Chi-Lin of Chinese Taipei on day two of the Toyota Thailand Open on January 20, 2021 in Bangkok, Thailand.Shi Tang / Getty Images

The Chew brothers from California began playing badminton tournaments together in 2018 and now they are heading to the biggest stage in sports for competition.

“Some people tell us they would never be able to play with their sibling but, for us, we do a good job at communicating with each other, whether it’s suggestions about our game or style, so it works out for the two of us,” Ryan, 24, told Reuters.

Brother, Philip, 27, competed in the 2016 Games, and both credit their grandfather, Don Chew, who founded the Orange County Badminton Club in 1996, for coaching them in the sport.

Aria and Makenzie Fischer

In 2016, Aria and Makenzie won gold at the Olympic Games. Getty Images

The Fischer sisters always knew they wanted to compete in the Olympics, just like their dad, Erich Fischer, who competed with the U.S. Men's National Water Polo team in Barcelona at the 1992 Games.

In 2016, Aria and Makenzie made that dream a reality when at 17 and 19 they became Olympic gold medalists in water polo. Together, they will compete again in Tokyo.

"I got a lot of motivation from seeing Makenzie grow up and starting to have success — just chasing her, wanting to be as good as her, and trying to be better than her," Aria shared in a USA water polo interview.

Courtney and Kelley Hurley

American Sisters Kelley Hurley (left) and Courtney Hurley pose for the camera during warm-up for the Women's Epee event on June 13, 2017. The Hurley's would take 1st and 2nd in the event at the Pan-American Fencing Championships at Centre Pierre-Charbonneau in Montreal, Quebec, Canada.Devin Manky / Getty Images

It hasn't always been family fun for U.S. Women's Fencing Team's Courtney Hurley, and sister, Kelley.

"When I was younger, it was more competitive between me and her, and when she got in there behind me I just thought 'C'mon, Courtney, this is my glory. Move on. Fence a different weapon or something.' It was very competitive between us for 2008," the older Hurley, 33, told USA Fencing in an interview. "But by 2012, we had definitely come to terms with our competition against each other and we joined forces with each other."

The sisters, who both graduated from Notre Dame University and are coached by their dad, earned a bronze medal in the London 2012 Olympic Games. The Tokyo Games will mark the fourth Olympic appearance for Kelley and third Olympic competition for Courtney.

Jessica and Nelly Korda

Jessica Korda (L) walks down the 15th hole with her sister and teammate Nelly Korda during the first round of the Dow Great Lakes Bay Invitational at Midland Country Club on July 14, 2021 in Midland, Michigan.Sam Greenwood / Getty Images

There is no sibling rivalry between golf stars Nelly Korda, 22, and big sister Jessica, 28.

"People like to put us against each other all the time to see if they can spark a rivalry or something," the older Korda sister told Golf Digest in a November interview. "But we just keep disappointing everybody."

The duo, daughters of tennis stars Petr and Regina Korda, aren't the only family athletes. Their brother Sebastian plays tennis professionally.

"My dad always said back in the day that golf was a retirement sport," Jessica told Golf Digest. "We’ve obviously completely changed his mind."

Henry and Jackson Leverett

(L-R) Jack Hobson Leverett III, Henry Turner Leverett and Keith Sanderson of the United States pose for pictures after winning the gold medal in the men's 25m rapid fire pistol final of the ISSF World Cup 2021, at the Karni Singh shooting range in New Delhi on March 28, 2021.Money Sharma / AFP via Getty Images

Born just seventeen months apart, Henry and Jackson Leverett competed in their first shooting competition when they were 8 and 9 years old, respectively. Both students at Ohio State University, the brothers from Georgia have set four USA Shooting national records in junior men’s Rapid Fire and junior men’s Sport Pistol.

“It means a lot to me to have this experience with my brother,” Henry told USA Shooting.“It’s my first time in Japan and at the Games, so to have my best friend there with me is really comforting, especially when the competition and chaos begins.”

Kristie and Samantha Mewis

Sisters Kristie Mewis #22 and Samantha Mewis #3 of the United States celebrate together after they're win over the Netherlands during a game between Netherlands and USWNT at Rat Verlegh Stadion on November 27, 2020 in Breda, Netherlands.Brad Smith / Getty Images

Two soccer star sisters will take the field in Tokyo together. Kristie Mewis, a 30-year-old Houston Dash midfielder, will team up with her younger sister, Samantha, a midfielder for the North Carolina Courage.

It won't be the first time the elder Mewis has taken the field in Japan; she played for Iga FC Kunoichi Mie in Japan’s women’s league in 2014. The Mewis sisters are the first to represent soccer for Team USA.

"I feel like the only thing that could have made me making it better was that Kristie made it too," Samantha told People earlier this month.

Erik and Kawika Shoji

USA's Erik Shoji (L) and USA's Kawika Shoji celebrate winning the 2018 FIVB World Championship bronze medal final 3-4 match Serbia vs USA on September 30, 2018 in Turin.Marco Bertorello / AFP via Getty Images

Known affectionately as volleyball's 'Bro-jis', Erik Shoji and brother, Kawika, who is the team captain of the Men’s USA volleyball team, will make their second Olympic debut in Tokyo. The brothers, who hail from Honolulu, took home the bronze in Rio in 2016.

Parents, Dave and Mary Shoji, who both coached volleyball, will be cheering from their home in Hawaii.

"You know, we might need two different TVs going at the same time because Dave honestly makes it very difficult to watch with him because of that intensity," Mary Shoji told NBC affiliate Hawaii News Now. "Once in awhile I have to say, can you just please be quiet?”