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Mom of two Kristin Davis had the best response for why she's currently single

The "And Just Like That..." star opened up about being a single parent and the woes of dating in a new interview.
/ Source: TODAY

Kristin Davis is the first to confess she hates casual dating.

“I’m sure anyone who ever dated me is reading this and being, like, ‘Yes, she was never good at it.’ It’s a difficult area for me,” the “And Just Like That…” star said in a recent interview with The Sunday Times.

“I’m not interested in the small talk, I find it boring,” she continued. “I just want to cut to the deep stuff, and they don’t always want to do that. And then, I mean, I’m just terrible at casual sex, OK, just terrible, like terrible … Which is not to say, in my youth, that there wasn’t … you know, it’s funny too, you look back and you’re like, ‘Did I know that was casual sex?’ I’m not sure.”

Davis returned as Charlotte York Goldenblatt in the "Sex and the City" reboot, "And Just Like That..."Craig Blankenhorn / HBO Max

That’s not to say that Davis, 56, isn’t open to dating at all.

“I mean, I’m not not dating but I’m not actively dating,” she said, and added she's "open to the unexpected."

Her standards, however, are set high for potential partners: One major reason is that she’s very careful about who she introduces to her children, Gemma, 10, and Wilson, 3.

“I say to my children that I’d have to find somebody that was good enough to be in their lives,” she said. “I’m not going to let somebody be around them, or influence them, or be any kind of father figure unless they’re amazing. The bar is high.”

She acknowledged that “the choice-making” aspect of being a single parent — as in, having to make big parenting decisions alone, without being able to bounce them off a partner — can be tough.

Both of Davis’ children are adopted — she adopted Gemma in 2011, and Wilson in 2018 — and both are African American.

The “Sex and the City” star opened up about raising them as a white woman. Davis has been deliberate about giving her children plenty of role models and said she is constantly educating herself and seeking guidance from Black friends.

“You’re having to educate them about the world, but also somehow let them feel that they can be empowered to still try to change it,” she said, explaining how she has navigated conversations with her children about the Black Lives Matter movement. “You don’t want to frighten them to the point where they won’t feel like they can go out in the world and shake it up as we need them to do. It’s a very delicate thing.”

She also said she doesn't share photos of her children on social media because "they don’t need their faces associated with how people feel about interracial adoption.”