Jimmy Fallon is every dad in quarantine bribing his daughters with this trick

We're pretty sure there isn't a parent alive who hasn't resorted to bribery at some point.
/ Source: TODAY
By Samantha Kubota

In a new interview with People magazine, "Tonight Show" host Jimmy Fallon says he's relishing his time at home with the kids, even though he's trying to put on a show from his house every night during the coronavirus pandemic.

"I love it actually, I'm really bonding with them more than ever," Fallon told the magazine.

People

But his two young girls, Winnie, 6, and Franny, 5, don't really understand that he's doing bits for the entire world to see, Fallon said.

"They're not aware that I'm broadcasting this to millions of people," he said. "So if I have them help me out with a bit, they're very themselves which is cool."

His girls definitely seem comfortable on camera and have been getting in on the host's sketches since the coronavirus forced "Tonight" to stop filming at its Rockefeller Plaza studio weeks ago.

Fallon took one day off and then started creating at-home versions of the show with the help of his wife, Nancy Juvonen, and two little girls.

He told People it hasn't been easy, and his daughters often pop up in scenes when their parents hadn't planned on it.

"There's a couple of shows where I was like, 'All right, I've got to do this by myself. I'm just going to lock myself in the bathroom,'" Fallon said. "There's no sense in me going, 'Hey, listen to Daddy. We're doing a monologue here.'"

He added that he's even gone as far as to bribe the two — something most parents can probably identify with.

"If they're being too silly, I can say, 'Hey, if you help me out with this, I'll let you play an hour of the 'Lego Incredibles' on PlayStation,'" he explained. "It's their favorite thing in the world."

Regardless, the two little girls have become a hit with his audience.

Winnie recently shared that she lost a tooth, interrupting her dad's interview with Ciara and Russell Wilson. The two also delighted fans when they played with their toys and mostly ignored Fallon as he rattled off jokes during his monologue.

Juvonen told New York magazine they had decided to include their kids in the segments to show viewers that their family is just like everyone else’s.

“Look, this is what we’ve got,” Juvonen told the magazine. “The only thing we kept thinking was if we’re not ourselves and authentic and in our sweatshirts and taking walks and being messy and doing life, then (the audience is) going to feel it, and we can’t sustain it.”