Sign up for the TODAY newsletter

You have successfully subscribed to the TODAY newsletter.

Subscribe now and get trending stories, celebrity news and all the best of TODAY.

How this famous couple is dealing with their kids' sibling rivalry

The actors get real about raising two boys, and supporting each other.
by Donna Freydkin / / Source: TODAY
Jenny Mollen Jason Biggs
Getty Images

Get the latest from TODAY

Sign up for our newsletter

Double the pleasure, double the diapers, double the — drama.

At least, that’s the case with actors Jenny Mollen and Jason Biggs, who are raising sons Sid, 4, and Lazlo, 5 months, together. The actors say that adding another kid into the mix has been, well, a little fraught. And very different from the photos you see of Princess Charlotte sweetly cuddling younger brother Prince Louis.

“It’s hard to keep it together. It’s hard to have any time with each other now that they are two,” Mollen told TODAY Parents.

It doesn’t help that the older brother isn’t exactly fond of his sibling.

“It’s man coverage now,” said Biggs. “The other one doesn’t like him. Full steam. We’re on death watch every day. It's like a brick wall."

How does Mollen, for one, deal with it when Sid gets angry? "With Sid, I want to hear him out and understand why he's upset," she said. "I really want to try to understand him."

For the two actors, who are the hosting the relationship game show “My Partner Knows Best” on Lifetime, the toughest part of parenting is “not getting mad at each other. Our kids will do something to set us off and instead of hating them, because they’re obviously perfect in our eyes, we hate each other,” said Mollen.

Mollen, who recently revealed on social media that she is dealing with "a thyroid issue," is refreshingly candid about the challenges of raising two young boys and helping them develop into functioning adults.

“You’re going (mess) that up. They’re going to be mad at you for something and that’s the hardest thing about being a parent. No matter how perfect you’re thinking you’re doing it, you’re going to upset them and there are things you’re doing that will hurt them in some way. That’s devastating to accept,” said Mollen.

As for mom-shaming, Mollen heads that off at the pass.

“I’m so self-deprecating that I get to myself before someone else can. My son is so young right now. We’re all trying to just figure it out,” said Mollen.

Get the latest from TODAY

Sign up for our newsletter
MORE FROM today