Parents

Hogwarts Express train from Harry Potter rescues family stranded in Scottish Highlands

A family of six that was stranded in the Scottish Highlands ended up getting a magical ride home.

Scottish pastor Jon Cluett, his wife Helen, and their four children ranging in age from 6 to 12 were picked up on Friday by The Jacobite, an old steam train just like the one known as the Hogwarts Express in the Harry Potter films.

AP
A family of six was rescued by the Hogwarts Express after becoming stranded near Loch Eilt in the Scottish Highlands.

"The policeman said, 'We’ve arranged for the next train passing to stop for you, and you’re not going to believe this but it’s the Hogwarts Express steam train. Your kids are going to love it,''' Cluett told The Associated Press.

The family was staying in a lakeside hut when a storm washed away the family's canoe. Facing a trek of several miles through marshy ground with small children, Cluett called police to see if they could be rescued.

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The original Hogwarts Express train used in the movie is currently at the Warner Bros. Studio in Los Angeles.

They told him the Jacobite runs on a remote route in the Scottish Highlands not too far from where they were, leading to the coolest rescue ever for a group of kids who are all Harry Potter fans.

In the movies, the Hogwarts Express takes Harry and his fellow wizards and witches to school. Parts of the movies films involving the train were also filmed on that route in Scotland.

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'Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone' is now an interactive eBook!

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'Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone' is now an interactive eBook!

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Cluett was upset about losing the canoe, but had to admit it led to a happy ending.

"I'm slightly sad because I'd lost my boat. But the kids, when they saw the steam train coming, all sadness left their little faces and was replaced by excitement and fun — just the real joy of having an adventure and having the train stop right next to them,'' Cluett told the BBC.

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