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Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino shares terrifying footage of son choking on pasta

"THE SCARIEST MOMENT OF OUR LIVES!!"
/ Source: TODAY

A Ring camera captured heart-pounding footage of Mike “The Situation” Sorrentino's 2-year-old son, Romeo, choking on pasta.

“THE SCARIEST MOMENT OF OUR LIVES!!” the “Jersey Shore” star captioned an Instagram video on Feb. 3. 

In the clip, Sorrentino, 41, and wife Lauren, 39, are at home eating dinner with their children, Romeo and Mia, 12 months, when suddenly Romeo begins to cough. There’s a piece of gnocchi — an Italian dumping — lodged in the toddler’s throat. 

Romeo’s parents spring into action. Sorrentino lifts the boy out of his chair and delivers several back blows to dislodge the obstruction, while Lauren uses an airway clearing device. The couple, who are expecting their third child, manage to stay remarkably calm the entire time.

“I am so proud of how my wife and I didn’t panic, didn’t hesitate and eventually dislodged the food,” Sorrentino wrote, noting that together they saved their son’s life. 

“I love my family with all my heart and am so grateful things worked out. It’s safe to say we are now taking CPR lessons,” he continued. “And Romeo won’t be having gnocchi anytime soon.”

One person commented: “Lauren’s calmness is absolutely amazing. You never know how you will react in a sudden and scary situation, and she my friends, had smoothness like a surgeon!”

Added another, “Good job and Dad! You guys handled that like pros!” 

Choking is a leading cause of death among children younger than 4, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP). Most incidents are associated with food, coins and toys.

Peanuts, edamame, grapes and hot dogs are common foods that doctors advise parents not to give children under 4, according to Dr. Erica Michiels, a pediatric emergency medicine specialist at Helen DeVos Children’s Hospital in Grand Rapids, Michigan.

“Those foods ... are kind of the right shape or size to really lodge in the airway,” Michiels previously told TODAY.com

When a child is actively choking and struggling to breathe, Michiels said to call 911 and start performing the Heimlich maneuver.