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In defense of candy

The New York Times ran an interesting profile this week on Samira Kawash, the mastermind behind the Candy Professor blog. Motivated by a desire to untangle the “threads of control, danger and temptation” that are interwoven with the popular perception of these unabashedly non-nutritional foods, Kawash’s blog acts as a palpable blow against an empire of what she calls “candy alarmists.” V
Martin Gerten / EPA / Today

The New York Times ran an interesting profile this week on Samira Kawash, the mastermind behind the Candy Professor blog. Motivated by a desire to untangle the “threads of control, danger and temptation” that are interwoven with the popular perception of these unabashedly non-nutritional foods, Kawash’s blog acts as a palpable blow against an empire of what she calls “candy alarmists.” Via scrupulous research into the history of candy manufacturing, Kawash hopes to dispel the guilt and stigma associated with these processed foods, especially when so many popular, purportedly “healthy” foods contain virtually identical amounts of sugar as candy products.

With Halloween just a couple of nights away, many households are steadying themselves for an undue influx of candy. Parents, what are you feelings about candy? Are you planning on rationing out your kids’ Halloween spoils? Have you researched which are the best and worst candies for health? Do you feel guilty about indulging in candy yourselves? Grab another handful of candy corn and leave your thoughts in the comment section below.