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Crib notes: A paycheck for being a mommy? Sign us up

We all know that a mom's job is hard work -- but is it time to make it a paid position? A leading South African businesswoman has said it's time to institute a 10% "mommy salary," where stay-at-home moms would receive 10% of their husband's paycheck as compensation for their contributions to the household. She believes the role of mom is currently an undervalued position and that by adding some fi

We all know that a mom's job is hard work -- but is it time to make it a paid position? A leading South African businesswoman has said it's time to institute a 10% "mommy salary," where stay-at-home moms would receive 10% of their husband's paycheck as compensation for their contributions to the household. She believes the role of mom is currently an undervalued position and that by adding some financial benefits to the job, it would allow more women to be home without resenting the sacrifice of their paychecks. What do you think? Even if all the money had to go straight to paying bills, would it help to know you'd earned some tangible income for your hard work?

While most moms just nag their daughters to make them a grandma, one Australian woman's doing them one-better. She's donating her uterus to her daughter, who was born without a womb. She'd previously tried to serve as a surrogate for her 34-year-old daughter, who does have ovaries that produce eggs, but it didn't work. Her 34-year-old daughter also unsuccessfully attempted adoption, which has led her to give the transplant a try. If the initial surgery is a success, she'll have to wait a year before attempting IVF treatments. This is the second mother-daughter womb donation, with the first one happening earlier this year in Sweden.

As a teen, getting sucked into your parents' hobbies can often feel like punishment. But, for one 16-year-old girl, whose father is a self-declared "Renaissance Fighter," his hobby really did become her punishment. After she attempted to run away from home, he first beat her with a switch, then decided it wasn't sufficient. He then outfitted her in Renaissance armor, handed her a shield and wooden sword and forced her to battle him for two hours when she then collapsed. Though badly bruised, she was eventually able to text a friend who, in turn, called the police.  Her dad was booked into jail for assault and her step-mom was also arrested for failing to intervene in the medieval punishment. Anyone surprised that she tried to run away to begin with?

Arr, matey. Can we interest ye in some pirate's lemonade? It's for a good cause. One dad, whose two young sons wanted to start a lemonade stand so they could buy new toys, convinced them to donate their earnings instead. In 2008, the then three and six-year-olds, raised a couple hundred dollars. Over the years, Jack and Eric's Pirate Lemonade's earnings (and therefore their donations) have increased. Each year, they pick a new charitable organization to contribute to and their summertime lemonade stand earnings all go there. In 2011, that organization got more than $1,000 from these entrepreneurial, philanthropic young boys.

Rev your engines ladies, because the hot new career for moms is monster truck driving. A small but growing number of moms is ditching the minivan and climbing in the monster truck. The racing season is part-time (mainly on the weekends) and seasonal (mostly January through March), which makes it conducive to a working mom's schedule. Not only is the schedule easy on a mom, but their kids love it. Many of their children sit together in the stands and cheer their moms on. Some of the kids even get in on the action themselves. One mom, "Fancy" Nancy Weston, says her driving grew out of her son's love of Power Wheels. Not content to let mom have all the fun, her sons ages eight and six are also monster truck drivers (in smaller trucks, designed to accommodate their smaller frames). It's said that a number of moms on the circuit have six-year-old sons. We're pretty sure that having your mom be a monster truck driver is a dream-come-true for most six-year-old boys.

Dana Macario is a TODAY Moms contributor and Seattle mom to two sleep-depriving toddlers. She is currently developing an alarm clock that will start an IV coffee drip 10 minutes prior to wake-up time. Once properly caffeinated, she also blogs at www.18years2life.com.