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Crib notes: No chocolate milk for you, kids in L.A.!

Chocolate and strawberry were just voted off the cafeteria line. Plain Jane is the lone survivor. In the eternal battle against childhood obesity, Los Angeles Unified, the country's largest school district, has banned flavored milk from schools. The ban comes after celebrity chef Jamie Oliver criticized the district for serving kids the sweetened milks, saying they contain the sugar equivalent of

Chocolate and strawberry were just voted off the cafeteria line. Plain Jane is the lone survivor. In the eternal battle against childhood obesity, Los Angeles Unified, the country's largest school district, has banned flavored milk from schools. The ban comes after celebrity chef Jamie Oliver criticized the district for serving kids the sweetened milks, saying they contain the sugar equivalent of a candy bar. While the move was largely applauded, some are now eyeing the fruit juices the district continues to serve, which reportedly contain even more sugar than the banned milks. O.J., consider yourself on notice.

OK, sweetie, just slide down that pole with your legs in the air and a seductive pout on your face. That's it, good job. Time to go or we'll be late for preschool. Oh yes, it's as gross as you're fearing it is. Pole dancing for children as young as three. Let the moral outrage begin.

Mom stress is on the rise. While the news is not likely to surprise anyone, it is comforting to know that you're not alone, with upwards of 80 percent of moms reporting that they experience stress sometimes or frequently. The reasons behind the increased stress are probably also familiar -- societal expectations and their counterpart, perfectionist parenting, combined with some pesky biological conditioning, which ensures moms respond faster to crying children. Add to that a decline in social networks that support and help new moms and you've got a lot of women who are stretched too thin.

Many cities, and even some countries, have banned smoking in public places. Now, New York state may ban smoking in cars when passengers aged 14 years and younger are present. If passed, those who light up illegally could face a $100 fine. The move wouldn't be unprecedented, as four other states have already taken the measure.

Dana Macario is a TODAY Moms contributor and Seattle mom to two sleep-depriving toddlers. She is currently developing an alarm clock that will start an IV coffee drip 10 minutes prior to wake-up time. Once properly caffeinated, she also blogs at www.18years2life.com.