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Crib notes: Fake guns (the pointer-finger kind) banned from one school

What is it about boys and guns? In the absence of toy guns or sticks they can pretend are guns, many inventive lads use their fingers as pretend guns. However, one school in England has told some seven-year-old boys to holster their pointer fingers at school. While some think that even pretend hand guns send a dangerous message, others believe school officials are going too far to squelch a harmle

What is it about boys and guns? In the absence of toy guns or sticks they can pretend are guns, many inventive lads use their fingers as pretend guns. However, one school in England has told some seven-year-old boys to holster their pointer fingers at school. While some think that even pretend hand guns send a dangerous message, others believe school officials are going too far to squelch a harmless playtime activity.

Dirt, it's what's for dinner. Kids who like to make mud pies only to have their culinary expressions squashed are finally in luck. New research shows that while dirt may be dirty, it's by no means bad for people to consume and may even be beneficial. Some think that a little earth in one's diet may help by shielding the stomach against ingested parasites and plant toxins.

One mother whose daughter has Down syndrome had feared her daughter's high school years would be difficult and isolated from her peers. Instead, her well-liked daughter was recently named prom queenat her school. The student body also voted for a boy with Down syndrome to serve as prom king. "It really hit me at prom that night: What I had imagined for her turned out to be the exact opposite," the girl's mother, Mary Alten, told the Cincinnati Enquirer. Alten's story undoubtedly gives hope to mothers of special needs children everywhere.

Divorce is hard on kids and now a study says that children whose parents are divorced are more likely to struggle with math and social skills. Researchers had expected kids of divorced families to begin experiencing setbacks during the end-stage of their parents' marriage, and were surprised to find that the difficulties generally don't begin until official divorce proceedings start. The study also showed that developmental problems continue, but do not worsen, post-divorce.

With Oprah gone and soap operas losing their luster with younger viewers, many wonder how TV shows will fill the days of our (TV-viewing) lives until the evening news airs. Daytime televisionprogramming has long been geared towards the stay at home mom. SAHMs are evolving, their viewing habits are changing and television executives are struggling to keep up. Some believe there will be less scripted drama in the future and more talk and reality programming.

Dana Macario is a TODAY Moms contributor and Seattle mom to two sleep-depriving toddlers. She is currently developing an alarm clock that will start an IV coffee drip 10 minutes prior to wake-up time. Once properly caffeinated, she also blogs at www.18years2life.com.