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Crib notes: Are spineless parents to blame for kids' tantrums?

If you can't squelch your child's temper tantrum or other poor behavior in a public space by giving "the look," are you failing as a parent and failing your child while you're at it? One father says that it's spineless parents, and not their bratty kids, who are to blame for the fact that many people dislike children. He states that parents would be doing their kids (and society at large) a favor

If you can't squelch your child's temper tantrum or other poor behavior in a public space by giving "the look," are you failing as a parent and failing your child while you're at it? One father says that it's spineless parents, and not their bratty kids, who are to blame for the fact that many people dislike children. He states that parents would be doing their kids (and society at large) a favor by teaching them that they are not the center of the universe. Is he overly harsh, or have parents become too lax when it comes to curbing bad behavior?

Forget road rage, nowadays people are brimming over with baby name rage. Prospective parents are increasingly attempting to be unique and creative when it comes to naming their offspring, which often results in outrage from those around them. The author of a baby name book, who also has a website that tracks the popularity of given names over the years, among other things, says that names are generally on a 100 year popularity cycle. What are some of today's trends? According to the author, in addition to the influx of new and unusual names, a return to using ethnic names has emerged, along with selecting boys' names ending in 'n' and girls' names ending in 'a.'

Ironic, hipster T's for kids have long been popular. But do you ever wonder who first thought to silkscreen a faux-kitsch superhero logo on a baby's onesie? One woman, who claims her parents were pioneers in the ironic kids clothing movement, shares the story of their company and their marriage, along with a fond remembrance of the duds they created. Hmm, that reminds us, is that "iPoo'd" shirt still in the laundry?

What is it about buses and women that sparks a personal rights debate? Back in the day, Rosa Parks became a symbol of the civil rights movement by famously refusing to give up her seat at the front of the bus for a white passenger. Now, Afrykayn Moon is making headlines after she refused to stop breast-feeding her two-week-old baby on a bus in Detroit. Though Moon says she was incredibly discreet (and nursing in a state whose laws protect public breastfeeding), the bus driver arranged for security to meet the bus and escort her off the vehicle. Moon, who is a member of the Black Mothers' Breastfeeding Association, has since staged a nurse-in at the bus system's facilities and also created a YouTube video discussing the incident.

It's not just the members of the military who make sacrifices for our country -- their families do too. Researchers who have studied the medical records of children whose parents are on active duty found that kids whose parents have been on long deployments (especially to Iraq and Afghanistan) were more likely to suffer from mental health problems. Some say that while people used to view deployment-related issues in kids as a single experience, new research is showing that the resulting difficulties are not always short-term.

Dana Macario is a TODAY Moms contributor and Seattle mom to two sleep-depriving toddlers. She is currently developing an alarm clock that will start an IV coffee drip 10 minutes prior to wake-up time. Once properly caffeinated, she also blogs at www.18years2life.com.