Government issues warning to consumers about dresser sold on Amazon, Walmart

The CPSC's warning comes after IKEA paid a $46 million settlement to a family whose child died after a dresser tipped onto him.
/ Source: TODAY

The Consumer Product Safety Commission is urging consumers to anchor a dresser sold online at large retailers like Amazon, Home Depot and Walmart to prevent potential injuries to children.

The CPSC said in a news release that the Hodedah HI4DR four-drawer dresser should be anchored to the wall or placed where children cannot get to it because it poses injury and entrapment risks.

The Consumer Product Safety Commission is urging consumers to anchor this Hodedah HI4DR four-drawer dresser to the wall to avoid a potentially fatal hazard to children. US CPSC

The dresser, which sells for between $100 and $200, weighs about 75 pounds when empty. It measures about 40 inches tall, 27.5 inches wide and 15.5 inches deep and is sold in beech, black, cherry, chocolate, mahogany and white colors, according to the CPSC.

The organization said it's also pressing Hodedah to recall the dresser.

CPSC's warning comes two days after IKEA agreed to pay $46 million to the parents of a child who died after a recalled dresser tipped onto him. IKEA also reached a $50 million wrongful death settlement in 2017 with the families of three children who were killed by falling dressers.

Utah mom Kayli Shoff released a home surveillance video in 2017 of her son Bowdy, 2, rescuing his twin brother, Brock, after Brock was trapped beneath a dresser when it fell over, in order to illustrate the dangers of unsecured dressers.

"I hope that people watching the video will react to it and it'll make them feel a little something," Shoff said on TODAY. "I want parents to know that you can't baby proof your house 100 percent. You've got to take the small steps and just do it."

Furniture tip-over incidents resulted in an estimated 20,900 emergency room visits and at least 89 deaths from 2014 to 2018, according to the CPSC. The majority of the deaths involved dressers toppling onto small children.