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Meet 3 Black kids who started changing the world before age 10

These changemakers are determined to make a difference.
/ Source: TODAY

It’s safe to say these kids are determined to make a difference.

Sam White, 6, wanted to show they kids could be anything they want when they grow up, so he created an ABC rap that shares a letter with corresponding career path.

Sam White is inspiring millions with his career ABC rap.Sam White

“You can be an S, stockbroker, you get to work with money,” he raps in the viral video that has racked up more than two million views.

One of those views was former First Lady Michelle Obama, who shared the video to her Instagram page.

“She posted it online and the mommy showed it to me,” White told TODAY co-host Sheinelle Jones in a segment celebrating Black joy on TODAY Monday. “And so it felt really good.”

Sam isn’t the only one getting a nod from someone in the White House.

Cavanaugh Bell, 8, was being bullied and never wanted other kids to feel the “darkness” he felt inside.

Cavanaugh Bell started a food pantry to help those affected by the pandemic.Cavanaugh Bell

“I made it my mission to make sure that other kids really don't have to feel what I've gone through,” Cavanaugh told Sheinelle.

Using his own savings and donations from a GoFundMe campaign, Bell began creating care packages for the elderly. Eventually, he was able to open a community food pantry.

His efforts caught the eye of Vice President Kamala Harris, who shared his venture on Twitter.

“It just made me feel beautiful inside, that I was actually able to help people in the first place, and to actually have a bunch of donations to start my own community pantry that'll help thousands of people,” Bell said.

Another young entrepreneur is 16-year-old Mikaila Ulmer. At 4, Ulmer entered her lemonade recipes in a contest and was inspired to launch her own business.

Mikaila Ulmer started a lemonade business at just six years oldMichael Desmond / Getty Images

Since, she’s landed a deal on the show “Shark Tank” and become the proud owner of "Me & the Bees lemonade."

“I think that as kids, we are— we're really good at dreaming of the possibilities rather than the problems,” Ulmer said. “I'm quite honored that I have so much support and so many people who are excited to see Black girls thrive. But it's also like I wanna make sure that I'm representing, like, our sisters well. There's pressure on me to make sure that I'm doing well and setting a good role model.”

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