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Why '1000-lb Sisters' star Tammy Slaton was 'mad' about co-star Amy's pregnancy

The TLC star learned she was expecting her first child 4 months after having weight loss surgery.
/ Source: TODAY

Amy Slaton of TLC’s docuseries “1000-lb. Sisters” admitted to being “scared as hell” after discovering she was pregnant just four months after undergoing weight loss surgery.

Amy’s sister and co-star, Tammy Slaton, also had concerns. The American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery recommends women avoid getting pregnant for 12 to 18 months to allow their weight to stabilize and correct any nutrient deficiencies.

“I was feeling all sorts of things — I was mad and sad and worried about her health and safety since it was so soon after her surgery,” Tammy, 34, told People.

"1000-lb. Sisters" stars Amy Slaton and Tammy SlatonTLC

In a clip from the season premiere, airing Monday, Tammy is caught off guard by the news that Amy, 33, and her husband, Michael Halterman, are expecting their first child.

“I mean, don’t get me wrong, I want ya’ll to have kids, but it’s too soon,” Tammy tells Amy.

Amy doesn't argue.

“I know, it’s like, I’m scared as hell, because it was only four months ago that I had my surgery and now I’m pregnant,” she replies.

According to Dr. Michael Fishman, a board-certified bariatric surgeon at Grand View Health in Pennsylvania, Slaton has put herself at risk for pregnancy complications.

Tammy and Amy Slaton pose on their front porch. Scott Ippolito / TLC

“We know the risk of miscarriage is extremely high in the first 12 to 18 months after having weight loss surgery,” Fishman told TODAY Parents. “Your body is working so hard to help this fetus grow, but at the same time you’re dropping all this weight. It’s counterintuitive to what a body should be doing during a pregnancy.”

Fishman said Slaton can expect to be monitored closely throughout her pregnancy.

“It doesn’t mean she won't have a successful pregnancy,” he said. “But it is high-risk."

Amy remains hopeful.

As she told TODAY Parents last month, “I’m ready to be a mom and all that comes with it."

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