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A real-life hoverboard and 5 more sci-fi wonders you can buy now

Great Scott! The hoverboard is finally here and it can be yours for only $10,000.Heavy, I know. But this is real — unlike the Tony Hawk-endorsed marketing stunt from last spring. The Hendo Hoverboard is taking off like Marty McFly on Kickstarter, raising more than $70,000 on its first day. The board uses four engines to create a magnetic field that lets it float an inch above the ground and gli
Hendo Hoverboard
Hendo
Think McFly, think! The new Hendo Hoverboard, currently raising money on Kickstarter.Today

Great Scott! The hoverboard is finally here and it can be yours for only $10,000.

Heavy, I know. But this is real — unlike the Tony Hawk-endorsed marketing stunt from last spring. The Hendo Hoverboard is taking off like Marty McFly on Kickstarter, raising more than $70,000 on its first day. 

The board uses four engines to create a magnetic field that lets it float an inch above the ground and glide straight into your childhood fantasies. The Hendo Hoverboard, however, is not the only sci-fi gadget available for those with astronomical budgets. 

The Aero-X relies on fans, not the force, to keep it moving at 45 miles per hour.Today

"Star Wars": The Aero-X Hoverbike

You will feel like a stormtrooper racing through the Forest Moon of Endor on this baby, a hovercraft that "rides like a motorcycle," according to Aerofex. It uses a pair of ducted fans to propel itself as fast as 45 miles per hour, all while floating up to 10 feet in the air. All you need to reserve your own is $5,000 ... which is a deposit for a pre-order for a vehicle that will cost an estimated $85,000 when it supposedly comes out in 2017. 

"Star Trek": 3-D Food Printers 

The replicators from "Star Trek" can make everything from tea, Earl Gray, hot, to a bowl of Kohlanese stew. While 3-D printers can't rearrange subatomic particles, they can print layer over layer of stuff — from frosting to cheese — to make different dishes. The ChefJet from 3D Systems, which is due out later this year for under $5,000, will be able to print elaborate chocolates and candies, while Natural Machines' Foodini should be printing ravioli, pizza dough and more in homes by the middle of 2015 for around $1,300, a company spokesperson told TODAY.

"Minority Report": Leap Motion Controller

When Steven Spielberg's "Minority Report" came out in 2002, it was Tom Cruise's transparent, motion-controlled display that captured everyone's attention. More than a decade later, several companies are working on similar technology. The Leap Motion Controller might not be as advanced as the device from the film, but for $100, it's a pretty cool way to swipe through games, photos and more without ever touching a mouse or keyboard. 

"Iron Man": Prosthetic Hand

Tiny Tony Starks, it's time to suit up. This prosthetic hand was built to help kids with disabilities live and look like "Iron Man." Mechanical designer Pat Starace used a 3-D printer to print this particular hand, which comes equipped with Bluetooth connectivity, a USB charger, voice-controlled LED "lasers" and a "thruster" that lights up when the hand is tilted back. He is giving away the one he unveiled last week for free and is partnering with the online community E-nable to create more. His goal for the prosthetic hand? To make it "look awesome" and "raise self-esteem to superhero levels." We think it's pretty safe to say "mission accomplished."

Photo:+#SpaceShipTwo+lands+after+her+54th+test+flight.+Credit:+Scaled+Composites+/+Jason+DiVenere+pic.twitter.com/w7VTcviCbN

—+Virgin+Galactic+(@virgingalactic)+October+7,+2014+

"2001: A Space Odyssey": Commercial Space Flights

In Stanley Kubrick's science-fiction masterpiece "2001: A Space Odyssey" (which just got an awesome new trailer), a Pan Am space plane takes Dr. Heywood Floyd from Earth to the space station above. Pan Am might be extinct, but the idea lives on at Virgin Galactic, which is now booking suborbital spaceflights for $250,000 a pop. Homicidal robots and enigmatic monoliths not included.