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Texas Gov. Greg Abbott ‘livid’ about being ‘misled’ on police response to Uvalde shooting

But he rejected calls for gun control legislation, claiming long guns are a part of the Lone Star State’s history.
/ Source: NBC News Contributor

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott said Friday he was “livid” about being “misled” on initial reports of the immediate police response to the school massacre in Uvalde.

But Abbott, at a press conference in Uvalde, rejected any calls for increased gun control measures — such as background checks — in response to the mass shooting at Robb Elementary School, where 19 children and two teachers were slaughtered.

Abbott and other officials earlier this week said a school resource officer confronted the killer as he entered campus, a claim that law enforcement later retracted. There were also conflicting timelines about how long law enforcement agents waited before entering the school to stop the gunman.

The governor said investigators need to “get to the very seconds of exactly what happened with 100 percent accuracy and explain it to the public and most importantly to the victims who have been devastated.”

Abbott insisted officials will get to the bottom of why responding police didn’t take more aggressive action to “eliminate” the killer.

“There will be ongoing investigations that detail exactly who knew what when, who was in charge and what strategy (was used), why that particular strategy was employed, why were other strategies not employed,” Abbott said.

Image: Texas Gov. Greg Abbott
Gov. Greg Abbott speaks during a news conference in Uvalde, Texas, on May 25, 2022.Eric Thayer / Bloomberg via Getty Images

“Bottom line would be, why did they not choose the strategy that would have been best to get in there to eliminate the killer and to rescue the children.”

Uvalde Mayor Don McLaughlin, seated next to Abbott, conceded he’s been left as dumbfounded as the governor by the changing stories of law enforcement.

This story first appeared on NBCNews.com.